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Cbus’ luck is out, rare disease test comes up positive

Cbus’ luck is out, rare disease test comes up positive

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Officials have said that after weeks of wondering, several cases have been caused by the rare enterovirus D68 virus in Central Ohio. “Columbus Public Health is closely monitoring this outbreak of respiratory illnesses and is working with area hospitals to protect the health and safety of all residents,” said Columbus Public Health Commissioner Dr. Teresa Long, according to NBC4.

Concern began when an increase of kids were coming into Nationwide Children’s Hospital with complaints of difficulty breathing and other respiratory problems.

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Previously September 15, 2014
Some specimens sent to CDC negative for rare disease

After fears that a rare virus might be causing children in Columbus to get sick, specimens were sent to CDC in Atlanta to be tested for enterovirus D68. Those specimens have come back negative, but Columbus still isn’t in the clear. Columbus Public Health has sent out about 20 samples and the rest of the results should be available by the end of the week. The virus has spread to other areas of the country such as Kansas City, Mo. and has resulted in children in the hospital with breathing issues.

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Previously September 8, 2014
Is a rare virus causing children’s illness?

Last week, more kids were rolling through Nationwide Children’s Hospital’s doors than usual with respiratory problems, which is also unusual for the time of year, the Dispatch reported. 52 patients a day were complaining of respiratory problems and at the center of that increase could be human enterovirus D68, said the medical director and assistant commissioner at Columbus Public Health, the paper reported. The virus also seems to have affected kids in Kansas City, Mo. The causes wheezing and shortness of breath.

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