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Fabric: Fashion for Everyone

Fashion is more than what we wear. It reflects who we are by making a silent statement to everyone we meet. But fashion doesn’t just happen. Whether your style is black tees and frayed jeans or a one-of-a-kind find from a boutique or thrift store, there was a long journey from the hands that made [...]
J.R. McMillan

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Fashion is more than what we wear. It reflects who we are by making a silent statement to everyone we meet.

But fashion doesn’t just happen. Whether your style is black tees and frayed jeans or a one-of-a-kind find from a boutique or thrift store, there was a long journey from the hands that made them to back of your closet or the bottom of your laundry bin. FABRIC wants to make that journey a little less daunting, from creators to consumers. What started as an ambitious experiment above the Idea Foundry is slated to evolve into a dedicated destination with shared workspace, a retail outlet, and an event venue for the multi-disciplinary demands of the city’s sometimes scattered fashion industry.

We went straight to the source for second act details of this novel co-working initiative from Amee Bellwanzo, Cofounder and Business Director for Alternative Fashion Mob, and FABRIC.

What was the inspiration for FABRIC? How did it come to be?

Alternative Fashion Mob came together in 2012 with the goal of giving a platform to independent local designers of all styles, in part by creating an ‘underground movement’ with Columbus’ style-savvy public to generate excitement for the local fashion industry in our city. Our goal has always been fostering local designers as small business people. The more we work with our designers, the more we’ve seen there are a lot of resources they need to really succeed as small businesses, and thereby really create an industry of independent fashion labels in Columbus—where there are currently a few big brands, and a lot of independent designers who are making clothing on a very small scale.

What did you learn from your experience at Idea Foundry? How did it change or refine your concept for FABRIC?

It was kind of our proof of concept. Our classes sold out, we had more requests than anticipated for photo studio rentals and other resources. The public came to events we held there—even though the location wasn’t the easiest. We kind of figured, if so many people are willing to navigate through the Foundry to join us in this old warehouse, there must really be a need for what we’re doing.

How is FABRIC similar and unique from other co-working concepts in Columbus?

FABRIC, as a co-working space, is focused on fashion designers and related industry pros, such as stylists and photographers. So that’s one point of differentiation from other local co-working spaces. It will also have a storefront where the public can purchase those designers’ clothes. While there are a few stores in town where you can purchase all kinds of locally made goods, from t-shirts to crafts to salsa, there are no stores that specialize in fashion. We’ll also have a designer-worthy selection of fabric and other raw materials used to create fashion. This will be a resource for designers, but will also be great for the hobbyist-level designers and sewers, who currently have only one or two big-box fabric stores that have more of a crafter market than a true fashion-forward ideal. We’ll have a photo studio—which fashion designers and other people can use or rent for fashion shoots, product catalogs, and creative projects.

What element of FABRIC will surprise people most?

Our space will be open to the public for fashion-related classes—for all levels, including professional designers to hobbyists and beginners—and all topics in the fashion industry including fashion photography, modeling, hair and makeup artistry, etc. We’ll also have an event space, which will be used for general purposes, including rental—but there will also be set times that the space is used for fashion events. It will come ready with a rollaway runway, so we hope it’s a great resource for all the fashion organizations in town. Essentially, FABRIC Columbus will be a true community center for creative activity and inspiration, where professionals and the general public can come together to be inspired and excited by local fashion.”

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Fashion

Short North shop offers convenient ways for men to boost wardrobes

Mitch Hooper

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Fashion trends come in waves, and at the moment in men’s fashion, it seems no wave is bigger than streetwear. It’s a combination of sleekly-designed hoodies and shirts with versatile bottoms. Graphic t-shirts—both long sleeve and short—have found new life with unlikely brands collaborating such as Supreme and Carhartt. It’s no longer a crime to walk out of the house wearing a groutfit (an all-gray outfit) and earth tones provide unique color options. And shoes? It seems shoes show no sign of slowing down as the “rare” value of finding a high end pair of Jordans or Yeezys is a race to the top. If there were a male version of Carrie Bradshaw, he’d be wearing streetwear.

This trend is no secret to our city either. Right in the heart of the Short North is Madison USA, a men’s fashion store with everything from your next favorite crew neck to a pair of shoes that might cost you upwards of $650. It’s all worth it in the end if you get that clout. Our photographer, Zane Osler, hooked us up with a few looks for men this season to get a leg up on the competition. Four Pins, if you’re reading this, put us on your fit watch 2019 list.

Brand: Darryl Brown. Top: White painter coat, $750. Pants: Paint Trouser, $308.
Brand: Aime Leon Dore. Top: Kanga Hoodie Sweatshirt, $137. Hat: Waffle Stitch beanie, $60.
Brand: Aime Leon Dore. Top: Crewneck sweatshirt w/pocket, $112. Pants: Camper pants, $112.

Madison USA is located at 1219 N. High St. For more information and to see what's new, visit madison-usa.com.

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Fashion

Local vintage stores offering old school duds for Buckeye fans

Mitch Hooper

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In the modern age of sports, your fanhood is often defined by your fashion. The variations of ways to support the Buckeyes range from shirtseys—a newcomers go-to for getting a player’s number on their back without shelling out $200 for a jersey—all the way to customized jerseys with your very own last name on the back. And somewhere in between lies a world that Homage has inspired: throwback styles of sporting apparel.

90's SweatShirt: $43 (Photos: Brian Kaiser)

What’s not to love about vintage gear? Compared to an authentic jersey from Nike, you’re saving loads of money without sacrificing style. They often represent an older time of Buckeye athletics that you can wear as a badge of honor which states, “I watched the Woody Hayes days, and I remember John Cooper all too well.” The aforementioned Homage is a great entry point for anyone looking to get in the game, but thrift stores and vintage clothing stores like Smartypants Vintage in the Short North offer even more unique ways to show you bleed scarlet and gray—or at least fit the part.

Left to Right: "Columbuth" t-shirt: $36, 80s Spirograph: $40, Champion t-shirt: $40

We linked up with Smartypants Vintage to snag some throwback gear to boost your Buckeye fashion and not have to worry if someone else is rocking the same shirt as you. From t-shirts that more than likely were a freshman’s big buy at the bookstore on their first year on campus to crewnecks that are perfect for those cool fall days, here are a few looks to keep on your radar this season.

Poppin’ Tags

Have you caught the Buckeye thrifting bug? Here’s a few other spots in the city to fill your needs.

RAG-O-RAMA | 3301 N HIGH ST.
OUT OF THE CLOSET | 1230 N HIGH ST. CLOTHING UNDERGROUND, 1652 N HIGH ST.

GOODWILL | MULTIPLE LOCATIONS
SALVATION ARMY | MULTIPLE LOCATIONS
OHIO THRIFT | MULTIPLE LOCATIONS
VOLUNTEERS OF AMERICA | MULTIPLE LOCATIONS

Smartypants Vintage is located on 815 N High St. For hours and more vintage options, check out @smartypantsvintage on Instagram.

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Fashion

I Feel Pretty

I discovered tweezers at the ripe age of 12 and immediately developed an obsessive relationship with them. I pluck, pluck, plucked my brows until I couldn’t pluck anymore. (Literally. My mom had to physically disarm me and hide the tool for good.) By the end of it, you could count my remaining hairs on just [...]
Regina Fox

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I discovered tweezers at the ripe age of 12 and immediately developed an obsessive relationship with them. I pluck, pluck, plucked my brows until I couldn’t pluck anymore. (Literally. My mom had to physically disarm me and hide the tool for good.) By the end of it, you could count my remaining hairs on just a few fingers.My brows never really bounced back from my pre-teen years and to be honest, I don’t blame them—I clearly couldn’t handle the responsibility. So when the “boy brow” became the one and only style to sport, I was left out in the cold. That is until I discovered Pretty In Ink and got my eyebrows cosmetically tattooed.Mandi Chisholm, the owner of the gorgeous downtown loft, goes simply by her first name. She has been beautifying brows since 2008 when she became formally trained, certified, and licensed for cosmetic tattoo applications. With some conversation, numbing cream, and a whole lot of expertise, she turned me into the “after” version of myself I didn’t know I could be. Let me tell you a little more about how I ditched my brow burden.ConsultationThe first step to my brow makeover was a consultation. Mandi and I met to discuss three things—skin type, lifestyle, and expectations—in order to pinpoint which tattooing service was best suited for me. Oily skin, a fast metabolism, and exercise can all contribute to rapid fading. Lucky for me, I check all three boxes. I also told Mandi that I was in the market for a natural-looking fix to my 90s eyebrows which narrowed my options down to two: machine tattooed brows and microblading.Machine brows are done using a fine needle within a hand piece powered by electricity to puncture and deposit pigment. Microblading, on the other hand, is a very popular, manual application using a simple blade to place the pigment into the skin. Machine brows tend to last a little longer, while microblading is more of a superficial application of pigment placed just a little higher in the dermis.To be honest, I had never heard of the former and the sounds of it intimidated me a bit. But, considering the toll my skin type and lifestyle would take from microblading, Mandi and I both agreed that machine tattooed brows were the best, most durable option to meet my eyebrow expectations.DrawingAfter considering the shape of my face and some #browgoals photos I showed her, Mandi used a makeup pencil to fill in my brows. This would ultimately become the shape of my tattooed brows, so I made sure to take my time and vocalize any changes I wanted to make. Once we settled on a shape, Mandi leaned me back in the chair and booted up the tattoo machine.TattooingNow, we all have different levels of tolerance, but in my opinion, the pain was minimal. The cosmetic tattoo machine hurts far less than a typical tattoo machine. Plus, after the first pass, Mandi slathered me up with numbing cream which eliminated the pain entirely. All I had to do was sit back and relax for about 90 minutes while Mandi worked her magic.The RevealWhen Mandi handed me the mirror for the first time, my jaw dropped—even further than it did when I got my braces off in 9th grade. My eyebrows looked fantastic! You couldn’t tell where my real eyebrows ended and the tattooing began! I couldn’t wait to go show them off.AftercareWith cosmetically tattooed eyebrows, you really have to channel your inner Philadelphia 76er and trust the process. On day one, my brows were precise and bold. By day three, the tattooed hair strokes had seemingly disappeared into clumps of brown scabs. And when the scabs healed, my tattoo pigment underneath was faded and did not match my natural eyebrow hair. But, this is all part of the process.Touch upI used a makeup pencil to supplement my faded tattoos until it was time for my touch up appointment a few weeks later. Mandi retraced my hair strokes and the healing process began all over but this time, when the scabs healed, my perfect brows miraculously reemerged and were there to stay. As long as I avoid the sun and excessive moisturization, I expect to not be back in the Pretty In Ink chair until this time next year.There’s a meme floating around FaceSpace that says, “When I was little, I never thought eyebrows would be this important.” What I’ve learned is that eyebrows themselves are just a couple stretches of hair on your forehead, but the confidence they give you is what’s so important. I can “face” each day self-assuredly without a lick of makeup and that is the power of cosmetic tattoos.
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