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Crime

OP: 3 times CPD officers lost our trust in 2017

614now Staff

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[su_testimonial photo=”http://614now.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/Screen-Shot-2017-11-15-at-11.48.14-AM.png”]By Steve Croyle [/su_testimonial]

We keep hearing that most cops are good, and that there are just a few bad apples, but if that’s the case, why is it so hard to extricate the bad cops from the job?

Columbus Police officer Randy Mayhew was violating the public trust at least since 2015, when the first recorded complaint of his conduct was reported. He was found guilty of three counts of prostitution, three counts of solicitation and one count of dereliction of duty but despite all that, avoided jail time. Instead, Mayhew was handed 30 hours of community service and a paltry $150 fine. This follows the laughable one day suspension the CPD chief suggested for Officer Zach Rosen for making the heroic decision to stomp on a detained suspect’s face, and Officer Joseph Bogard’s reprehensible remarks made during an arrest a few months ago.

This isn’t an indictment of all police officers, but skeptics in the general public might be more inclined to believe that these instances are anomalies if other cops would speak out against abuses, and judges would throw the proverbial book at cops who break the law in hopes of reminding all police officers that violating the public trust comes with dire consequences.

Police officers don’t have it easy, but people know that before they voluntarily sign up for the job. When you put on that uniform, along with the badge and gun that go with it, you are accepting a grave responsibility to protect and serve the public. In order to perform their duties effectively, police officers have the discretion to suspend, albeit temporarily, our constitutional rights.  Literally speaking, a police officer has a license to kill, and the means to do so are holstered at their side.

Since 9-11, we’ve allowed the script to be flipped. In addition to a militarization of our police force, there’s a culture of hero worship surrounding law enforcement that seems to foster a sense of entitlement in today’s cops. Too often courtesy and respect are traded for robotic hostility, and a presumption of guilt, This leads to tense interactions, that sometimes have lethal consequences. Rather than expecting people to show them respect, police should feel an obligation to prove themselves worthy of the honor that comes with being trusted with our lives.

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Crime

2 recent attempted abduction reports raise human trafficking concerns

614now Staff

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Two recent police reports have local families questioning whether they had a brush with human traffickers.

The first incident involved 18-year-old Kennedy Stokes, who said she and her cousin were approached by two men at a Walmart on November 21, reports 10TV. Stokes said the men tried talking to them several times and felt they were following them.

The next day, Strokes was experiencing car problems on her way home. She made it to the entrance of her apartment complex and got out to check under the hood. That's when a man approached and began grabbing at her.

Stokes noted he was wearing gloves and appeared to have a box cutter in his hand, reports 10TV. She was able to escape his grasp and suffered scratches on her chest.

Stokes believes it was one of the men from Walmart.

The second incident happened 14 miles away at a UDF on Indianola on the same day Stokes said she was attacked, reports 10TV.

A mother and her 12-year-old son were filling up at the gas station. She then went inside to pay, leaving her son in the locked vehicle.

When she returned, she said her son was visibly shaken up. He told her a man was yanking on the door handle, trying to get inside the vehicle. According to 10TV, the man didn't say anything, he only looked inside at the boy.

A security camera captured the incident, and police are currently reviewing the footage.

Both incidents have those involved wondering if they narrowly escaped a case of human trafficking. 10TV reports police are investigating both reports, including identification of suspects and motives.

For more on human trafficking, visit humantrafficking.ohio.gov.

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Crime

Man charged with killing wife in 13th OVI offense

Regina Fox

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A Central Ohio man is facing vehicular homicide charges after police say he committed his 13th OVI offense.

Robert Ellis, 53, was arrested and charged Tuesday after the October 16 crash in Prairie Township that killed his wife Dawn.

Ellis claimed he was not to blame for the accident, telling reporters another car went left of center, which caused him to lose control and crash into a pole. Investigators, however, say Ellis was at fault.

The accident marked his 13th OVI offense. Ellis maintains that he was not intoxicated during the time of the crash. He even told ABC on a phone call that he had only two beers at lunch.

An arraignment had yet to be set.

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Crime

Learn more about bizarre disappearance of Brian Shaffer

Regina Fox

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"Brian Shaffer was supposed to be enjoying a night out with friends on April 1, 2006. Instead, he vanished. 13 years later, the mystery of what happened that night still endures."

That's the description for Crime Junkie Podcast's newest episode. The installment focuses on second-year Ohio State medical student Brian Shaffer, whose disappearance has left his family, friends, and the entire community baffled for over a decade.

Listen below.

https://open.spotify.com/episode/7ht38SavqfnVViI0WYyLoe

To read more about Brian Shaffer's disappearance, click here. To read different theories about what could've happened to him, check out the Podcast Junkie Fan Club page. To view Brian's MySpace, click here.

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