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Take a virtual tour of the Kroger of tomorrow in UA

Mike Thomas

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The public finally got a chance to check out the newly-renovated Kroger store at 1955 West Henderson Road in Upper Arlington late last month, following a sweeping $3.1 million renovation.

While much remains the same, Kroger hopes the updates will help to better serve their customers, while bringing a more modern look to store’s overall appearance.

Here are just a few of the changes on display at this spiffy new Kroger location:

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  • The Chicken Co., a new quick-and-easy meal option offering fresh chicken meals and a-la-carte sides, has been added to the store’s deli section.
  • So long chrome—all cases throughout the store were replaced with sleeker, black-trimmed freezers.
  • The store’s looks in general were improved with a new décor package.
  • The perishable side, including produce, the cheese counter, the bakery, and the deli, is now more of an open concept. Maneuvering that bulky cart should be a breeze!
  • The pharmacy and surrounding space is one of the more noticeably-changed areas in the update, featuring a new layout and some interesting design elements (dig those hexagonal ceiling decorations!)

Kroger’s U.A. store is just the latest to receive the remodel treatment. Next up is the location at 199 Graceland Blvd., which will host an open house on Wednesday, August 14 from 4-6 PM following its own $4 million update.

Can’t make it to either of these locations but curious what changes might be in store for a Kroger near you? Take a look at our virtual tour of the Henderson Road store, showcasing some of the many recent upgrades:

Note: use the left/right arrows in the upper-left corner to navigate between images.

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Minimalist Moms: Local podcaster shares her advice on doing more with less

Linda Lee Baird

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Diane Boden found minimalism while standing with her then-fiancé in her parents’ basement, searching through boxes. He said, “These were once hours of your dad’s life that he worked away that are now in boxes.” Boden calls it her “ah-ha” moment. “It was like, oh my goodness! ... Are all these things that I’ve been consuming and desiring going to end up in a box in my basement one day?” They decided then that in their marriage, they would prioritize experiences over things.

Minimalism became so important to Boden that a few years later— after she became a mother—she started a podcast with her friend Megan Ericson called Minimalist Moms. While both approached minimalism in different ways, the friends shared the desire to live simply and possess only what they needed. Now hosting the show on her own, Boden told (614) about her minimalist journey, and shared some tips on how parents can pare down the stuff that comes with raising kids today.

(614): HOW DO YOU DEFINE MINIMALISM?

DB: I would say that minimalism is going to look different for everyone. ... I know Marie Kondo is really big into what sparks joy. I’m not completely on board with that, but if we’re speaking about what brings us joy ... there could be much more of an abundance of items in your home that bring you joy, whereas maybe for me, it’s fewer items. But I think it’s getting rid of what’s superfluous and what’s unnecessary.

HOW DID YOUR PRACTICE OF MINIMALISM CHANGE FOR YOU WHEN YOU BECAME A PARENT?

You can live with less and you don’t need a ton of things when you have children. ... If you look at other cultures or just like the way that people lived even like fifty, sixty years ago, it was very different. ... I’m also a big believer in quality over quantity. ... I will save up for something nicer so that I’m not having to replace it constantly.

Parenthood involves a lot of stuff, some of which you need, but much of what you don’t. How do you recommend dealing with the excess?

Communicate to [friends and relatives] to purchase experiences over things for your kids. We have like all the passes to everything: Franklin Park Conservatory, COSI, zoo. ... Utilize second hand-shops, utilize your neighbors. Ask around. Borrow over buying. ... That is so beneficial. I did that with my son, and I didn’t really buy any [clothing] for him until he was a year.

HOW DO YOUR KIDS RESPOND TO MINIMALISM?

I’ve already started talking to my kids [about] what our values are. ... If we go to the store and [my daughter] sees something she wants, I’m like, “Let’s put that on your wishlist,” ... We’ll either take a picture out or mommy will get out the note in her phone. ... That way we have something for when a birthday or Christmas rolls around.

I think that you can invite them in as they’re growing and allow them to make the decision. Like, “We can keep five of these items. Which ones are really special to you and which ones do you want to donate?” ... If we put that in them as they’re little, they’ll be more empathetic and giving as they grow.

WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE TO A PARENT WHO WANTS TO PLAN A MINIMALIST BIRTHDAY PARTY BUT DOESN’T WANT TO BE THE ONLY PERSON NOT TO SEND KIDS HOME WITH FAVORS?

Send them home with a treat, or send them home with a craft that they can do. ... The other parents are probably happy you’re not sending home a bunch of nonsense with their children. ... [Don’t give] a gift just to ... have a gift that you don’t really care about. I would say if you’re not intentional about it, don’t do anything. It’s just not worth your time, it’s not worth your money.

WHAT DO YOU DO ABOUT KIDS’ ARTWORK?

I’m very big into making Shutter y scrapbooks for us each year. ... I have a section in there called “Charlotte the artist,” and I take pictures of all of her artwork. The few pieces that I know I really want to keep, like she has one box ... we’re only gonna ll up the one box with art ... and once that’s filled, we need to pick and choose.

WHAT ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE SOMEONE WHO IS INTERESTED IN PRACTICING MINIMALISM BUT DOESN’T KNOW WHERE OR HOW TO START?

Start in the bathroom! I know that’s kind of bizarre, but it’s usually the smallest space in our home. ... I would say that there’s little old bottles of toiletries that we probably don’t need that are expired. It’s kind of like, why are we curating such a space that we’re only in to shower and use the [bathroom]?

I’ve never gotten rid of something that I’ve once looked looked back upon and regretted. ... If you haven’t used it in 3 to 6 months, you’re probably not going to use it, and it probably can be replaced down the road.

Minimalist Moms is available on iTunes and Stitcher. Follow on Instagram @minimalistmomspodcast

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Hobbies 101: Feel transformed, transported with language learning

Laura Dachenbach

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So, you made it through your high school (and maybe college) foreign language requirement. So, perhaps you never visited France or Germany or Mexico or took a job in China. You were probably thinking of a language as a job skill back then.

But, believe me when I say that economic reasons should be very low on your list when you consider studying a foreign language. The cognitive benefits of language study include an increased attention span, better memory, better decision-making skills, and staving off dementia. That’s all good and well.

But mostly, you should study a language for your own, totally self-indulgent reasons. For awareness. For human contact. For more beauty in your life. If you don’t believe me, read Eat, Pray, Love

Words are beautiful. They’re like clothes. You should try on a few different kinds and feel transformed. Or maybe transported.

The world of language learning is changing. With the increase in online learning services, your Japanese tutor doesn’t have to be from Central Ohio. Takelessons.com or thumbtack.com are cyberhubs to connect you with tutors of (almost) any language you’d like to study.

For a more traditional classroom approach, visit Ohio German Language School, Italia in Ohio, or Columbus State’s Language Institute

If you are searching for language maintenance or camaraderie, the Language and Culture section of Columbus Meetup can match you with German, French, Russian, Arabic, Japanese, or Italian-speaking groups. 

C’est tout maintenant. Enjoy your linguistic adventures.

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Now and Then: 6 historical Columbus sites and what they look like today

614now

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Progress in Columbus is happening everywhere you look. From campus to the Columbus Metropolitan Library Main Branch, the scenery has drastically changed.

While we can all appreciate the changes that have helped improve our city, it's also important to take a look back and value the landscapes that made Columbus into what it is today.

Below are six scenes from yesteryear juxtaposed to how that sites looks today. Just scroll over the photos to see the full "Before" and "After" shots!

Open Air School circa 1931

The Open Air School was a facility for students afflicted with tuberculosis. Construction began August 16, 1927, during a time when specialized tuberculosis sanitariums, homes, and other facilities were increasing across the country.

Station 6—Franklinton circa 1969

Engine House #6 operated from 1880 to 1966. It was the home of Fire Department's first emergency squad in 1934.

Columbus Metropolitan Library Main Branch circa 1907

An early view of the Columbus Public Library, also known as the Carnegie Library, and later known as the Main branch of the Columbus Metropolitan Library. The library was dedicated on April 4, 1907, and was built using funds donated by Andrew Carnegie.

Mirror Lake circa 1945

A view of Mirror Lake on the campus of The Ohio State University. The first use of the name, "Mirror Lake" occurred in the spring of 1896 when both the yearbook, Makio, and newspaper, The Lantern, used the term.

Leveque Tower and the Statehouse circa 1927

Leveque Tower was formerly known as the American Insurance Union Citadel. A competition was used to determine the design of the Statehouse building. Five principle architects were involved in the project with contributions from several others. The cornerstone was laid on July 4th, 1839.

High Street in the Short North circa 1912

To the left, the Railroad YMCA at 563 N. High St., with the Columbus Savings Bank at 561 N. High St. To the right, Troy Laundering at 548 N. High St. and the Unique Theatre at 558 N. High.

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