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You’ll want POPcorn for this rockin’ outdoor concert series

614now

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The Columbus Symphony just dropped their lineups for Nationwide Picnic with the Pops and Popcorn Pops: a sure sign that summer is right around the corner.

These popular outdoor concerts range in genre from classic rock, to Motown, to patriotic favorites, and, of course, a performance from TBDBITL. Columbus Commons will be your weekend destination for quality live entertainment all season long.

“I’m excited to share this wonderful summer of music with Columbus, and remember, singing and dancing are encouraged!” stated CSO Principal Pops Conductor Stuart Chafetz.

All concerts are held at the Columbus Bicentennial Pavilion (160 S. High St.) in the Columbus Commons. Gates open at 6 pm. Concerts begin at 8 pm.

2019 Nationwide Picnic with the Pops

Kool and the Gang
Friday, June 14

Stuart Chafetz, conductor

This two-time Grammy Award-winning R&B/funk supergroup performs their iconic hits such as “Celebration,” “Cherish,” “Get Down on It,” “Jungle Boogie,” and more.

Jefferson Starship
Saturday, June 15

Featuring original members David Freiberg and Donny Baldwin, this legendary American rock band performs from its catalog of more than 20 hit singles including “Jane,” “Miracles,” “Find Your Way Back,” and “We Built This City.”

The Music of Pink Floyd
Saturday, June 22

Performed with a full rock band fronted by vocalist Randy Jackson, this tribute captures the ethereal flow of Pink Floyd’s music in a concert that features megahits such as “Money,” “Learning to Fly,” “Comfortably Numb,” and selections from The Wall.

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Patriotic Pops
Saturday, June 29

Enjoy an evening of traditional patriotic favorites and American Top 40 hits topped off with a brilliant fireworks display!

Latin Explosion featuring Tito Puente Jr. and Jon Secada
Saturday, July 6

Tito Puente Jr. crosses cultures and generations with a high-voltage celebration of his legendary father, “The King of Latin Music” Tito Puente, including mambo and Latin jazz hits “Ran Kan Kan,” “Mambo Gozón,” and “Oye Como Va.” International crossover artist Jon Secada has sold more than 20 million albums and won three Grammy Awards with his soulful and melodic voice, scoring hits like “Angel,” “I’m Free,” “Do You Believe in Us,” and “If You Go.”

Dennis DeYoung and the Music of Styx
Saturday, July 13

One of the most recognizable voices in the music world today, Dennis DeYoung is a founding member of Styx and performs their greatest hits including “Lady,” “Babe,” “Come Sail Away,” “Too Much Time on My Hands,” “Best of Times,” “Mr. Roboto,” and many more.

The Spinners
Saturday, July 20

Up-tempo R&B and precision choreography define every performance of The Spinners as they perform hits from their more than six-decade-long career, including “The Rubberband Man,” “Then Came You,” “I’ll Be Around,” “Games People Play,” and “One of a Kind (Love Affair).”

The Ohio State University Marching Band
Friday & Saturday, July 26 & 27

Don the scarlet and gray and celebrate the coming season’s gridiron clash with the Columbus Symphony and “The Pride of the Buckeyes.” Don’t miss the biggest tailgate party of the year with “The Best Damn Band in the Land” and fireworks!

Ticketing and Information

General admission lawn tickets are $30 in advance or $35 at the gate on the day of the show. Lawn tickets for children aged 3-12 are $10. Children 2 and under are free. Advance tickets can be purchased by phone at 614-469-0939, online at www.PicnicWithThePops.com, or in person at the CAPA Ticket Center (39 E. State St.).

A group discount is available for parties of 15 or more. Call 614-469-0939 (ext. 2) for more information.

Guests are encouraged to bring blankets and/or chairs for lawn seating.T

Tables of 8 or 10 are available for purchase, ranging from $360-$850 per table. Catering for the table is available at the discretion of the purchaser. Single table seats are also available and can be purchased in any quantity. Prices start at $50 per seat, and catering is not available. For more information or to purchase a table, call 614-469-0939 or visitwww.PicnicWithThePops.com, or in person at the CAPA Ticket Center.

Patrons may bring their own food and beverages or purchase from on-site vendors. For Picnic concerts only, patrons are permitted to bring their own beer and wine on-site.

2019 Nationwide Popcorn Pops

Sing, dance, and monkey around with the Columbus Symphony at two special family concerts recommended for children ages 3-12. Children will enjoy free popcorn and free pre-concert activities including face painting, art projects, playing with musical instruments, and the Columbus Commons Family Fun Zone with inflatables and open play activities.

Dance Party
Friday, June 21

The Columbus Symphony invites families to come ready to dance as they perform classical songs that will make you want to shake, rattle, and roll.

Movies & Maracas
Friday, July 19

Enjoy songs from your favorite family films including Star Wars, Frozen, the Harry Potter series, and more. The first 500 kids will receive a maraca to play along with the symphony.

Ticketing and Information

Tickets are $12 for adults and $10 for children aged 3-12. Children 2 and under are free. Tickets can be purchased at the gate on the day of the show, by phone at 614.469.0939, online at www.PicnicWithThePops.com, or in person at the CAPA Ticket Center (39 E. State St.).

All concerts are held at the Columbus Bicentennial Pavilion (160 S. High St.) in the Columbus Commons. Gates open at 5:30 pm. Pre-concert activities will be available from 5:30 to 6:45 pm. Concerts begin at 7 pm and run for approximately one hour. No intermission.

Patrons may bring their own food and non-alcoholic beverages or purchase from on-site vendors.

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The Muffins vintage “base ball” team pays homage to a traditional pastime

J.R. McMillan

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When Aaron Seddon first stepped up to the plate nearly a decade ago for the Ohio Village Muffins, he was actually stepping back in time. It wasn’t the same game he’d played in his youth. The rules and uniforms were unfamiliar, and pushing 30 as a walk-on wasn’t out of the ordinary. Even the spelling was different. This was 1860 vintage “base ball.”

No that’s not a typo—and no, the whole team didn’t forget their gloves either.

“When we’re talking to spectators about the differences in the game, they’re immediately concerned that we aren’t wearing gloves. That kind of protective gear didn’t enter the game until the 1870s,” explained Seddon. “We get a lot of our recruits from people who come to matches, who are intrigued by what we’re doing. We’re a close-knit group, even o the field. We’re a team, but we’re also a family.”

Photos: Brian Kaiser

Long before the days of hot dogs and dugouts, what we now know as baseball was played in fields and empty lots from Cooperstown to Hoboken. Historians still dispute the exact origin story of the sport, but generally agree that it was the inevitable intermingling of Union and Confederate troops that transformed the game into a national pastime.

But Columbus has its own history, mixed with a little folklore. Before the war, there were exactly zero baseball teams in the capital city, but shortly after its end, there were six. Players learned the sport from fellow soldiers from New York and New Jersey who brought bats and balls with them to pass the time between battles. Even the hand signals still used today for balls, strikes, “safe” and “out” arguably owe credit to the Ohio School for the Deaf in Clintonville, put into play a decade later to help their hearing-impaired athletes compete as equals.

Which brings us back to the matter of the Muffins. When the Ohio History Connection started their vintage baseball program in 1981, there was no prototype, only a rulebook. Recruiting most of that first team from their employees, they couldn’t help having some self-deprecating fun at their future expense. In the early days of baseball, your best players were referred to as the “first nine” followed by the “second nine.” Everyone left on the bench were called the “muffins.” A “mu ” was period vernacular for an error, back before they were counted. The name was so inside baseball, it was perfect.

“The umpire’s role isn’t really to arbitrate the game. He’s there to settle disputes between the players they can’t adjudicate themselves,” Seddon noted. “And the pitcher’s role is to facilitate hitting. In modern baseball, your pitcher is your best defensive player, to prevent the ball from getting into play. The game we play is before it became professional. Everyone was an amateur back then.”

Fans will also notice a suspicious absence of balls and strikes. Newspapers from the era report some batters taking 50 or more pitches waiting for just the right one, because if a hit was caught on the first bounce, it still counted as an out.

“Probably the biggest difference between modern baseball and the game we play is—if an opponent makes a really good play—everyone cheers,” Seddon revealed. “We’re playing a competitive game, we’re obviously both out there to win the match. But there’s much more camaraderie between the teams.”

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Speaking of the other team, the Ohio History Connection has more than one vintage baseball club. Much as the rise of men’s baseball inspired impromptu games among women well before Vassar College started the first formal women’s program in 1866, the Diamonds played their first match in 1994. Despite their parallel history and popularity, many of the early women’s vintage baseball teams have since consolidated or faded away, making matches more challenging.

Like the Muffins, the Diamonds also represent the game as it was played in 1860, which for women of the era was strictly recreational. The rules were the same, but even playing in back fields among themselves, the ladies often caused quite a social stir with their attire.

“We wear period-accurate dresses made from patterns of actual garments considered either a camp dress or a work dress. Someone who first starts out may play in a long skirt and a white blouse,” explained Jackie Forquer, who has played for the Diamonds for more than two decades. “We don’t play as many games as the men, but the time commitment is also less. We play festivals and exhibitions games. Our players who come from a softball background see this as another way to share their love of the game.”

Both the Muffins and Diamonds are technically historical “interpreters” who interact with spectators much as players would have in 1860, sometimes to exacting detail. Forquer, who plays first base, is sometimes the first ambassador for vintage baseball folks may meet, either through school programs or at the beginning of a game, with Diamonds matches often preceding the Muffins. Never breaking character, she’ll politely ask the umpire to seek the approval of the audience before women roll up or remove their sleeves before beginning play. Showing so much skin used to be scandalous.

Every organization has a historian, but vintage baseball happens to have an actual one. Dr. Jim Tootle came to the original version of the game later in life than most, but has still managed to outlast many of his peers. Having retired as assistant dean of the College of the Arts and Sciences at Ohio State, his passion for preservation is as infectious as his laugh.

“I’ve gotten to play in four major league parks from coast to coast. I thought my playing days were winding down when I stumbled upon this, and I’ve probably played 600 to 700 vintage games,” Tootle recalled. “It’s been a wonderful experience to represent the Ohio History Connection on our home field at The Ohio Village, but also to travel the state and the country.”

Tootle actually has written the book on vintage baseball—two in fact, not counting a third still used by prospective vintage baseball teams across the country trying to get their start.

“It’s like Civil War reenacting in a way because we give great attention to accuracy—interpreting the rules, our uniforms, and our equipment. And yet, the moment the first pitch is thrown, it’s not a reenactment anymore. It’s a real game, and we don’t know who is going to win,” Tootle chided. “I have to laugh watching ESPN anytime there’s a barehanded catch. They go nuts and show it three or four times. I feel like saying, ‘Come out to a vintage baseball game, every catch is a barehanded catch. Gloves weren’t even invented yet.’

For a complete schedule of games, including the 2019 Ohio Cup Vintage Base Ball Festival featuring 30 teams from across the country, visit ohiohistory.org

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(614)-360: Mystifying scenes from within Otherworld

Mike Thomas

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As avid 614NOW readers already know, Otherworld is an incredible immersive art space on Columbus’ east side that allows visitors the opportunity to step outside of the bounds of normal reality.

If you still haven’t checked out Otherworld in person, we hope this sampling of some of the incredible 360 views found within will kickstart your curiosity.

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Needless to say, these images pale in comparison to the real thing. Visit Otherworld for yourself, and discover all of the wonder and mystery that awaits. Until then, view our 360 gallery below to kick-start your curiosity.

Pro-tip: hit the “expand” button on the gallery’s top-right corner for a fullscreen view of the images.

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Brand new festival to bring adventure to your summer

614now

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A brand new festival is running, jumping, and climbing into Columbus later this summer. Scioto Fest will be a four-day adventure celebrating all things Scioto Audubon September 12- 15.

This dog- and kid-friendly event will include a Yappy Hour for big kids and their pups, and outdoor moving screenings for the little kids. Live music, vendors, and giveaways are to be enjoyed by all!

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From climbing, to camping, to slacklining, Scioto Fest is sure to get your adrenaline flowing.

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