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Rain likely caused sinkhole situation in Grove City

614now Staff

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Somebody call Noah because this rain is causing some real problems around here. Like Grove City, for example, where a sinkhole may have formed from the torrential downpours last night.

Grove City police were called to White Road and Briar Hill Drive at about 5:30 a.m. early Thursday morning to investigate a growing sinkhole on the side of the bridge, reports NBC4i.

UPDATE:All lanes of I-71 NB are now OPEN.*************************************************************************************Expect delays from Grove City this morning:#4yourdrive

Posted by Jennifer Bullock on Thursday, September 20, 2018

While the bridge will remain open as it’s safe enough to use and offers to only entrance and exit to the area, drivers are urged to use extreme caution.

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But Grove City isn’t the only area affected by the recent wet weather. Last night, ODOT closed I-71 between 11th Ave and I-670 and between Stringtown Road and SR 665; parts of Hilliard-Rome Road; and Hoover Road from Southwest Boulevard to Orders Road.

FEMA issued the following PSA to drivers:

With more rain in the forecast, the Flash Flood Warning issued last night will remain in effect until 8:00 PM tonight.

According to NBC4i Meteorologist Bob Nunnally, more than 25 inches of rain have dumped on us this month…and it’s only the 20th of June.

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Safe Space: New day dawns for animals in need at Sunrise Sanctuary

Mike Thomas

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Wooly Bully is a nine-year-old Jersey steer. He came to Sunrise Sanctuary after being rescued by an elderly couple who saved him from being put down by his previous owner. Having never spent much time around other cattle, Wooly typically likes to hang out near the front of the property with the pigs.

This is just one story. Of the approximately 170 animals who call Sunrise Sanctuary home, Sandra Horvath could tell you about all of them.

There’s Miss Ping, a pig saved from a factory farm by an eight-year- old’s birthday wish. Or Woody the goat, who’s down to one horn after an accident sustained while roughhousing with a ram.

Horvath knows each animal by name and can give a detailed account of how they came to be at Sunrise. She knows each one’s particular peccadilloes, their medication needs, the personal histories. It’s not just a matter of practicality. She speaks of—and to—each animal as a close friend and companion.

Photos: Leah Conway

Brooklyn, New York native Mindy Mallet started Sunrise Sanctuary in 2001 after relocating to Central Ohio in the ‘90s. The 16-acre property in Marysville is a farm-style refuge where rescued animals are free to live and roam the grounds. There are three large barns at Sunrise, along with miscellaneous small buildings, chicken coops, a sizeable pond, and Mindy’s own home. The animals have the run of it all, with some barricades here and there when inter-species divisions are necessary.

Animals who find their way to Sunrise will call the sanctuary home for the rest of their natural lives. With its mission of acceptance and love for creatures large and small, Sunrise is a beacon of hope for animals in need—not to mention the people who volunteer their time to care for them.

Horvath became a volunteer in 2013 after falling in love with the sanctuary during a public event held there. When the property next to the farm went up for sale, she sold her downtown Columbus condo and moved her life to be closer to her passion. Lending a hand with the day-to-day operations is now all but a full-time job for Horvath, who balances her role as a devoted caretaker to her animal friends with a career as a practicing attorney.

“The daily work is hard. It’s mostly just making sure everybody is treated individually with proper time and attention,” says Horvath. “It’s not hard to stay motivated, but there’s just always a lot you worry about.”

With over 170 animals to care for, “a lot to worry about” is perhaps an understatement. The cast of critters at Sunrise currently includes four steer, seven equine, six sheep, four goats, 15 pigs, roughly 27 cats, two bunnies, several rats, and a whole lot of birds.

“Our mission is to take on as many animals as we can responsibly, and give them the best life possible.”

While the emotional and physical labor involved in caring for this many creatures is substantial, keeping the sanctuary running also has its challenges. Between feed, medication, vet bills, and the cost of maintaining the grounds, among other miscellaneous expenses, funding the operation is financially demanding.

Sunrise depends on three primary streams of revenue to keep the lights on: contributions from private donors, assistance from grants, and funds generated through special events such as Sunrise’s monthly “open barn” days, when the grounds are opened to the public. In addition to the funding they provide, these events provide a valuable opportunity to educate the public on responsible animal stewardship practices.

“Our mission is to take on as many animals as we can responsibly, and give them the best life possible. We also like to educate people,” says Horvath. “If enough people visit farm sanctuaries instead of other types of places, like petting zoos, they’re going to connect with them on a different level, and I think the views about animals in our society will change.”

With increased education, the need for sanctuaries like Sunrise might disappear altogether. As it stands, Sunrise can’t always accommodate every animal in any given situation. While adoptions occur on a case-by-case basis, the sanctuary is currently at capacity. Providing the optimal care and attention for animals already in their care is the focus of the Sunrise staff.

“I hate saying no to anyone, because there are amazing animals out there that just need a chance. But if we said yes to everybody, we couldn’t take care of the ones we have,” Horvath explains. “We don’t ever want to get in a place where we can’t take care of the ones we have really, really well.”

Ideally, all animals would have a safe and happy place to call home. For now, Sunrise Sanctuary is a slice of heaven on Earth for a few lucky animals (and the people who love them) to enjoy.

To learn more about Sunrise Sanctuary, visit them on Facebook or online at SunriseSanctuary.org.

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Sports

The Big Ten: 10 things you didn’t know about OSU head coach Ryan Day

614now Staff

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Each season of Buckeye football presents new faces, storylines, and expectations for fans to follow. While the quarterback position is typically at the top of all conversations, this season brings an added layer: who is this new coach?

Photos: David Heasley

His name is Ryan Day, and after a 3-0 start as interim head coach last year, he stands as the only undefeated coach in OSU’s history. Sure, it was a short stint, but the glimpses we witnessed were promising. His prodigy quarterback, Dwayne Haskins, went on to blaze the Big Ten and take down That Team Up North. But now, the pressure is on. There’s no Urban Meyer to step in week four—this is Day’s team. So before we flood the Shoe ready for another National Championship run, let’s get to know the new head coach.

1. In his college days, Ryan Day did more than just serve as the captain of his football team.

“The guys loved [Day]. In intramural basketball, he was the one that got the guys together. He put the team functions together; he was the guy doing it. He was setting up the Fourth of July get-together with his friends. I think it has to do a lot with his upbringing in Manchester. He was brought up by some great people that were able to show him important values of family and important values of friends,” said current University of New Hampshire head coach Sean McDonnell, who coached Day in 1999 to 2001.

2. Besides Day, Manchester, New Hampshire is home to two other college football coaches: Dan Mullen of UCLA and Chip Kelly of UCLA.

While at UNH, Day’s offensive coordinator was the offensive- minded Kelly. Following graduation, Day rejoined Kelly in the NFL with a short stint at the Philadelphia Eagles as the quarterbacks coach for the 2014-2015 campaign as well as serving as offensive coordinator under Kelly with the San Francisco 49ers from 2015-2016. “I played for him 10, 12 years ago and he’s one of my closest friends in college coaching. I can thank him for everything in football that I’ve had. He leaves an impact on people’s lives,” Day said, as reported by NJ.com in 2015 after joining the Eagles.

3. Day was in a quarterback competition in college. He won his spot in a very impressive fashion.

“One game that sticks out; we were down 31-3. Ryan was the quarterback against Delaware and we came back to win the game in overtime. He put the team on his back, made some great throws, made a few great scrambles, but everyone knew that he was running the show—and more importantly—we could win and he was telling us so,” said McDonnell.

4. Day’s age (40) puts him in an interesting class of other young Buckeye head coaches who went on to become legends at the university.

Paul Brown, who led the Buckeyes to its first National Championship, stands as the youngest at 33. Next in line is Woody Hayes, 38, and we’re guessing you’ve heard of him.

5. Day and his wife Christina first met as T-ball teammates when they were six and coached by Christina’s dad Stan Spirou.

Ryan and Christina both grew up in Manchester, New Hampshire, and graduated from Manchester Central High School. “I tell Ryan all the time that Nina was the better player, but he denies it,” Spirou said in the 2019 Spring OSU Alumni Association Magazine. Stan Spirou also coached the men’s basketball team at Southern New Hampshire University for 33 years. Ryan and Christina, who goes by the nickname Nina, have been married since June 2005.

6. This tight-knit family dynamic is something both Ryan and Nina hold close to their hearts.

“Since Ryan became OSU’s coach, we feel like our family has grown. We now have our Buckeye family that we need to nurture and support so they all have a chance to thrive on and off the football field. We feel truly blessed for our kids, our extended family and now our Buckeye family,” Nina told (614). Ryan, a father of three children, gives credit to Nina for always being there. “Nina is the rock who keeps our family strong and makes it possible for me to coach. You have no chance in this profession without a strong, supportive wife.”

7. Day was familiar with Urban Meyer prior to arriving in Columbus.

In 2005, Day served as a graduate assistant to the Florida Gators. When he got the call from Meyer to be the offensive coordinator of OSU in 2017, he didn’t think twice. “I would have walked here,” Day said, as reported by the Dayton Daily News in 2018.

8. ...And Meyer didn’t beat around the bush for expectations when Day took over the team.

“‘You beat the rival,’ Meyer told him. ‘Every other game you have to win as well. Every player has to get drafted in the first two rounds. No off-the-field issues, and never lose to that rival,’” reported Dan Murphy of ESPN in 2019.

9. While serving at Boston College initially as a wide receivers coach from 2007-2011, he eventually moved into the offensive coordinator position as well as the quarterback coach from 2013-2014.

While running the offense, the coach improved Boston College’s run game which was averaging 91-rushing-yards-per-game to 212.5-yards- per-game. This boost of 121.5 yards-per-game stands as one of the biggest turnarounds in ACC history, reports NJ.com in 2015.

10. The Days are passionate about mental health.

The mental health crisis across America’s campuses is real, and the Days are quite literally “changing the game” with their support of the “On Our Sleeves” movement at Nationwide Children’s Hospital. Because of the loss of a family member to suicide and their concern for the mental and physical well-being of young people, the Days have started The Ryan and Christina Day Fund for Pediatric and Adolescent Mental Wellness to help increase awareness, programming, and treatment for mental issues that affect young people. Here, they share their reasons for championing this cause:

(614): What can you share about your own loss and adolescence that you think would be helpful for individuals and families facing mental health challenges?

Nina Day: When I was growing up, mental health wasn’t something people talked about. As an adolescent, I remember feeling different emotions and sometimes being very confused by them. But I didn’t know how to express what I was feeling, so I didn’t talk much about them. Today, thankfully, we’re more willing to talk openly about mental health issues like depression and anxiety. That’s so important because it gives people the confidence they need to seek help. I’ve learned, however, that even though someone may have a strong support network of friends and family, that may not be enough. Sometimes you need the help of a professional.

Ryan Day: I think it’s important for everyone to understand that mental illness is a sickness that needs treatment just like any other type of illness. I know it can be hard not to feel animosity toward someone suffering from mental illness. But the reality is that person is sick and needs help. Only by acknowledging this can we remove the stigma that’s so often associated with mental illness.

614: What made you choose this moment to tell your story and join the campaign?

ND: Our family has been directly impacted by mental illness, so it’s an issue that’s been very important to us for a long time. When Ryan became the head coach at OSU, it gave us the platform to really make a difference. So we’ve decided to take advantage of this opportunity to help people, especially adolescents and young adults, who are struggling with mental health issues.

RD: When I was recruiting in Massillon last year, the high school coach told me there had been five suicides in that community in less than one year. Those deaths inspired me to do research about suicide among teenagers and adolescents. I’ve learned that our country is in a crisis right now. We have a whole generation of kids who are struggling with mental health issues and need help, but they’re often afraid to seek it. When Nina and I heard about the “On Our Sleeves” campaign, we knew immediately that this was a great opportunity for us to help not just the city of Columbus, but the entire state of Ohio, as well. That’s why we committed $100,000 to create the Ryan and Christina Day Fund for Pediatric and Adolescent Mental Wellness at Nationwide Children’s Hospital.

614: College athletics are obviously high pressure. What can teachers and coaches do to support student-athletes’ well-being?

ND: I think the most important thing a teacher or coach can do is be accessible to the student-athlete. Coaches and teachers should make themselves available and encourage their student-athletes to come to them to talk or ask for help. Ryan and I tell our kids that it’s OK not to feel OK. When they are sick with the flu or an ear infection, their body doesn’t feel good. But there may be times when their mind doesn’t feel good, and it’s OK to talk about it. Ryan will always be there for his players when they’re struggling, either physically or emotionally, just like we’re here for our own children.

RD: I think coaches and teachers should provide an environment that supports the mental health and well-being of student-athletes. This should be a place where student-athletes feel safe discussing their feelings and asking for help and support. I want my team to know I’ll be there for them if they’re hurting or need help.

To donate to the Ryan and Christina Day Fund, visit nationwidechildrens.org/giving/on-our-sleeves/about/day- family-fund.

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Ohio State

Buck Wild: A visual history of Brutus

Lex Vegas

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As any true Ohio State fan knows, Brutus Buckeye is more than just a school mascot, he’s a crucial member of the OSU family. Since debuting on Oct. 30, 1965 at the Minnesota vs. OSU homecoming football game, Brutus has gone through many iterations, some definitely better than others. Here’s a look back at how Brutus became the lovable nut head we know him as today!

-1965-

The original Brutus Buckeye costume was an unwieldy papier-mâché creation, pieced together with crude bits of wood and chicken wire by undergrads Ray Bourhis and Sally Lanyon. They were simply tired of not having a proper school mascot, and decided to take things into their own hands. Surprisingly, it was an instant hit among the student body. After two weeks, the head was upgraded to a lighter and more durable fiberglass version, and the name was selected in student-voted poll in November 1965.

-1968-

Three years later saw the costume’s first major redesign, bringing with it a mouth that could be flipped from a wide grin to a pouty frown when the Bucks were doing poorly in a game. Luckily, because we’re talking about Ohio State athletics, that was almost never the case, so the mouth was kind of a moot point.

-1975-

For some reason, a full decade after introducing a mascot that was quickly beloved by the student body, Ohio State decided to really switch up the game and go with a much smaller and grotesquely horrifying head. The costume also featured a much more anthropomorphic body allowing the wearer full use of their arms. We understand what they were going for, but as you can see, the result was a goddamn horrendous disaster. This terrifying Brutus only lasted one year.

-1976-

After that ill-conceived costume was laid to rest, it was back to a large fiberglass head for the 1976 season. The arms were once again lost but the addition of big bushy eyebrows made this rendition still sort of creepy in its own unique way.

-1977-

Just one year later saw the debut of this incredibly dopey looking Brutus featuring a very timid facial expression and no mouth whatsoever. Not too intimidating by any means, but that hat is pretty sick.

-1980-

It took the school 15 years before they finally landed on a costume design that resembles the one we know and love today. A new decade saw Brutus’ enormous nut-head shrink to a size that could comfortably rest on the shoulders of its wearer. This allowed them the freedom to use their arms to get sports fans pumped the fuck up, which was the whole point in the first place.

-2007-

More than 40 years after he first debuted, Brutus had definitely earned a place as one of just eighteen characters in the Mascot Hall of Fame; a great honor that includes characters from all sports, both collegiate and professional.

-2017-

Today Brutus appears at over 500 events every year, from sporting events to charity appearances.  While he may undergo minor updates and wardrobe changes over the coming decades, he’s finally found his look, and Ohio State’s iconic nut-man is here to stay.

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