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Machine breaks down: Lacrosse leaving Columbus

Mike Thomas

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Sorry, Gear-Heads. It looks like the dream of major league Lacrosse in Columbus has come to an end.

According to a statement released yesterday, Major League Lacrosse has announced that the league would be reducing the number of teams from nine to six for the upcoming 2019 season.  The Ohio Machine was one of the teams to be eliminated by the contraction.

“This announcement comes as a terrible surprise to all of us at the Machine,” the official statement posted to the team website reads. “We share in the incredible disappointment in this upsetting news with all those that have supported us over the years. As shocking as this news is, it should not be seen as a reflection of the tremendous success that the Machine, and the game of lacrosse in Ohio, has experienced in recent years.”

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The announcement states that business partners and ticket holders for the 2019 season will be contacted and issued full refunds.

The news comes as some surprise in light of the team’s many accomplishments in recent years. The Machine appeared in four straight playoff berths under head coach Bear Davis, including back-to-back appearances in the MLL Championship game, and a championship win in 2017.

The dissolution of The Machine leaves the future of the team’s stadium in question, as well. Fortress Obetz was the nation’s first purpose-built professional lacrosse stadium, and also served as home to the now-defunct Fashion Meets Music Festival.

So long, Machine. You join the ranks of such bygone Columbus-based teams as The Chill and The Destroyers (though the latter is soon to be revived). Please share your fondest memories of Ohio’s first pro lacrosse team in the comments.

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Elderly Dublin man narrowly survives deadly weekend hike

Mike Thomas

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A weekend outing with his grandsons nearly ended in tragedy for one Dublin man according to a report from the New Hampshire Union Leader.

Rescuers found 80-year-old James Clark of Dublin at 1:15 AM Friday morning on a Mount Washington trail in New Hampshire. Clark was found in the fetal position with signs of hypothermia, and was treated at a hospital for what authorities say were non-life-threatening injuries.

Clark had to be carried about 1.7 miles down a trail after his two teenage grandsons went ahead without him. Clark said that the plan was for the boys to go on at their own pace, as they had done the previous two days while climbing the highest peaks in New York and Vermont.

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Mount Washington was the third leg of a five-day trip for Clark and his grandsons. According to reports, he was unable to continue due to extreme cold temperatures on the mountain.

Unfortunately, other weekend hikers were not as lucky as Clark. On Friday, 69-year-old William Whittenaur of New Hampshire died following a medical emergency on a New Hampshire trail.

Likewise, Sandra Lee of  New Jersey succumbed to an unknown medical condition while hiking on one of the state’s trails, and was pronounced dead at the hospital

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Will Gov DeWine’s new program really improve your BMV experience?

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Everyone’s least favorite errand will hopefully become less painful. Ohio Governor Mike DeWine, Lt. Governor Jon Husted and Ohio Bureau of Motor Vehicles Registrar Charles Norman are working together to launch a pilot program to improve customer service at the BMV.

Specifically, drivers seeking a license renewal and vehicle registration will see changes to the process, reports NBC4i. Stay tuned for more details on the ins and outs of the program.

The program launched at 10:00 AM today.

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DeWine’s office says the new system aligns with an overall effort by the administration to make government more efficient.

How are some ways the Ohio BMV could improve customer service? Let us know in the comments below.

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How the “wettest year in Ohio history” could affect your grocery shopping

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While the rain may be ruining your weekend plans, it’s ruining the livelihoods of farmers around the state and, potentially, your grocery list. We are currently experiencing the wettest yearlong period in Ohio history, causing the state to be the farthest behind in planting corn and soybeans compared to all states that plant the crops, according to experts from The Ohio State University and federal reports.

And the trickle-down effect may impact your grocery shopping.

“Individual shoppers looking for specific items may experience hiccups in their availability or swings in their price,” said Ohio State University Department of Horticulture and Crop Science professor Matthew D. Kleinhenz, PhD.

As of June 9, only 50% of Ohio’s corn crop and 32% of its soybean crop was planted, a report from the U.S. Department of Agriculture shows. By now, Ohio typically is 96% done with planting corn and 89% done with soybeans, reports the College of Food, Agricultural, and Environmental Sciences at Ohio State.

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But, the problems aren’t over once farmers get their crops in the ground.

“The growers who have been able to plant a corn or soybean crop likely will have to contend with other challenges that come with a lot of rainfall: more weeds, pests, and diseases,” reports Ohio State.

Though consumers may have more limited or more expensive offerings in the produce section this harvest season, the impact of the rain will have little effect on your shopping experience.

In my opinion, on the whole, Central Ohio shoppers can expect little change in the availability, etc of produce,” assured Kleinhenz. “The supply of produce is very resilient thanks to farms being located in many areas, the expertise of farmers, and other factors.”

Kleinhenz also reminds shoppers to remain patient and positive when something they’re looking for is not available, and use this time to enjoy what is available from growers.

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