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4 painting classes to help cultivate your creativity

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Whether professional or amateur, there’s more than a few painting classes in Columbus for adults to choose from. Paired with wine and cocktails, or even dedicated to illustrating your pet, these classes are wide-ranging. While each class is taught by a different instructor, their affirmation for students is one and the same. Recently, (614) spoke to four artists who are leading the city’s adult painting trend.

Michelle Diercks

Though Wine & Canvas originated in Indianapolis, it was Michelle Diercks who founded the Columbus branch, noticing the expansion of the art market. “It’s for people who want to come for leisure to relax and enjoy themselves. I find it fascinating when someone’s like ‘Oh, who’s your demographic?’ and there really isn’t one,” she says. “We have kids, girls night out, dates—it’s a really fun environment.” While Wine & Canvas is meant for leisure, as guests indulge in flowing alcohol to relax any first-time painters, Dierck assures participants that the experience will put them at ease. “People are looking for that kind of experience; they want to have a creative outlet but there’s a lot of commitment to trying to pick up an art hobby. This gives them a sample and it’s a safe environment because they’re there to have fun. There’s an instructor that’s helping you,” she says. “The instructor’s not going to critique your work; they’re really there to help and support and to really break it down for you so you understand that it doesn’t have to be perfect.”

Contact:wineandcanvas.com/columbus-oh.html

Photos: Brian Kaiser

Joe Lombardo

Pushed into teaching an adult painting class through his former CCAD professor, Michael McEwan, landscape painter Joe Lombardo centers his classes on plein air painting, meeting guests at parks such as Goodale and Schiller. “I have several lessons where I try to teach them that painting is not precious. I also have to sometimes get them to think differently, because they’ll just come to the class thinking that a painting has to look absolutely real,” Lombardo says. “Accuracy is sometimes given up for expression, it doesn’t have to be perfect and exact.” Associated with various art platforms, including Columbus Cultural Art Center and McConnell Arts Center, Lombardo teaches adult students not to fear the canvas, but to embrace its intimidation to allow room for confidence. “I think that art-making, painting, drawing and self-doubt come hand-in-hand,” he says. “Something about when you’re going to pour yourself into this work of art, and part of making art is not just for you to look at, but for people to see it.”

Contact:josephlombardo.weebly.com

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Anna Sokol

Furnished with open windows, long tables covered by brown paper and a canvas space for the owner’s own work, Art With Anna began as a children’s art studio before starting adult classes. “I was in my twenties and I was teaching these adults, parents and grandparents. It was daunting at first, but honestly, they’re just like children,” she says. “There’s this unknowing, and all people want to do is learn how to be better, so it made sense. People just want attention and to be directed and receive guidance and a way to be creative, but that has diminished as we become adults.” Wanting guests to be pleasantly surprised by their crafts once leaving class, Sokol says that painting can be like “ripping the bandaid off”— conquering fear before putting paint brush to canvas. “One of the things I say is, ‘It’s a canvas, not a tattoo,’ ” she says. Getting it perfectly right on a canvas is so debilitating sometimes that I can’t get their mind into perspective, like ‘You are allowed to mess up.’ ”

Contact: artwithanna.com

Maureen Clark

One step into Maureen Clark’s studio below Chromedge Photo Lab in Franklinton, and you’re fully immersed in works of impressionism, and perhaps a complimentary can of PBR. Much like Wine & Canvas, Clark holds her own Paint & Pour classes once a month at Camelot Cellars, where students can paint their own wine glasses with themes that correlate hand-in-hand with any given holiday that month. “Art is one of those things that’s beyond that language barrier. Art is so interesting because it’s healing, it’s therapeutic,” she says. A former manager of Art With Anna when Anna Sokol had her first child, Clark welcomes guests to bring in their own templates, observing that they ultimately tend to put their own spin on individual works. “There’s always one person in the class that’s overwhelmed and thinking ‘Oh gosh, I could never do this,’ ” she says. “It’s always wonderful at the end to see that they have done it, and sometimes they’re the best ones.”

Contact: maureeneclarkart.com

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Community

Cedar Point, Kings Island are suing to get you back

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It just doesn’t seem fair, does it? Columbus Zoo & Aquarium are allowed to re-open but Cedar Point and Kings Island have been snubbed in Gov. Mike DeWine’s most recent announcement that Ohio’s entertainment venues were allowed to re-open.

After being left out of the party, Cedar Point, Kalahari Resort and Kings Island sued the director of the Ohio Department of Health Thursday, arguing that Dr. Amy Acton doesn’t have the authority to keep the state’s amusement parks and waterparks shut down and in doing so is violating the park’s rights.

The lawsuit was brought by attorney Maurice Thompson, executive director of the 1851 Center for Constitutional Law. The county health departments for both parks were also named in the lawsuit.

No word yet from the Ohio Department of Health as to when, or if, either amusement park will be allowed to open in June.

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Updated hours for North Market as first Farmers’ Market of the season opens Saturday

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Get excited Columbus foodies - this Saturday marks the beginning of North Market’s Farmers’ Market season! The Farmers’ Market will tantalize your taste buds every Saturday this summer through October, from 8 a.m. until noon at the North Market outdoor plaza at 59 Spruce Street.

During the coronavirus pandemic, North Market provided customers with fresh pick-up bundles. Now they’ve updated their operating hours to give consumers who want to shop again a chance to pick their own culinary delights.

"The hope is that a gradual reopening will strike a balance between the desire to serve the public and still respect the very real health concerns still shared by merchants, public, and staff," said Rick Harrison Wolfe, North Market's executive director, in a press release Thursday.

The updated hours, which will go into effect this Sat., June 6, are as follows:

  • Monday - Tuesday: closed
  • Wednesday - Friday, Sunday: 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.
  • Saturday: 10 a.m. - 6 p.m.

All of those in attendance will have to observe the following guidelines as outlined in a press release by North Market:

  • North Market's mask requirement that applies to indoor merchants and guests will also apply to all outdoor vendors and guests.
  • Access to each farmers' market booth will be limited. Markings on ground will indicate this requirement and will show the distance required between people. Only one person/group traveling together may be in each box at a time.
  • Several farms and vendors will offer contact-free shopping and pre-orders. North Market asks that guests pre-order and plan out shopping trips when possible. This helps keep crowds to a minimum and lines moving smoothly.
  • Farms and vendors will provide hand sanitizer for guest use.
  • North Market farms and vendors are committed to helping prevent the spread of illness by washing hands frequently, covering coughs/sneezes, staying home when sick, and avoiding exposure to others who are sick. We ask that all guests follow the same protocols and do not visit North Market or the Farmers' Market if feeling ill.
  • North Market farms and vendors will continue to strictly follow all local public health guidelines, safety protocols, and best practices.

If you’re interested in which merchants will be open on what days, North Market has been dedicated to providing you with that information during the pandemic. You can find the list, which is updated daily, here.

Although there are still limitations on indoor seating, outdoor seating on the porch and the farmers’ market plaza are currently available.

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Weekend Getaway: Ohio State Park lodges reopen

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Cooped up inside of our homes for the past few months, everyone could use a change of scenery. Luckily for those that love the great outdoors of Ohio, the perfect getaway is now possible once again.

The Ohio Department of Natural Resources announced on May 28 that all nine Ohio State Park lodges would be reopened by June 5.

The places where you can escape to are listed below in order of closest proximity to Columbus to furthest:

  • Deer Creek
  • Burr Oak
  • Mohican Lodge
  • Salt Fork Lodge
  • Shawnee 
  • Hueston Woods
  • Maumee Bay
  • Punderson Manor

Director of State Park Lodges Tom Arvan had this to say in the May 28 press release:

“Our staff has been working diligently to ensure that guests return to a safe and sanitized environment following the CDC safety guidelines. Our goal is for our guests to feel comfortable as they enjoy the fun activities and relax in the natural beauty of the lodges and all the state parks have to offer this summer.”

Visit https://www.greatohiolodges.com/ to secure your much-needed wilderness adventure today.

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