Now Reading
COVID-19 Coverage: Expert tips for staying healthy during your stay-at home

COVID-19 Coverage: Expert tips for staying healthy during your stay-at home

Mitch Hooper

It’s been nine days since Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine has placed the state under a shelter-in-place order. However long this will last is unknown, but Dr. Anup Kanodia has a suggestion: use this time for your own self-health.

Dr. Kanodia, an Akron-native, is the owner and head MD at KanodiaMD in Westerville. He did a fellowship of alternative, integrative medicine at Harvard University and went on to earn his Master’s in Public Health. His practice focuses on integrating functional medicine with conventional medicine. In addition to owning his own private practice, he works part-time with addiction clinics and part-time with urgent care.

“What we’re finding, in my practice, is that a lot of people want to know how do they help themselves in this time. What can they do beyond social distancing and hand washing?” Dr. Kanodia said.

To find ways to cope and grow through this situation, 614Now talked with Dr. Kanodia via Zoom. Here are some of his tips to finding happiness and peace during these stressful times.

BROUGHT TO YOU BY

1.) Get into a routine

Working, sleeping, living, and eating in the same place can make the days feel like they blur together. Dr. Kanodia says a daily routine can be exactly what you need to help create a separation of your work and personal life as they collide together at home.

“[It starts] with having a regular sleep schedule,” Dr. Kanodia explained. “And then getting out of the house first thing in the morning; meaning go for a walk, or go get something. But if you’re stuck inside the house all day long, that’s going to ruin your mental health.”

For folks working at home, he also suggests making your work space separate from your bedroom. Don’t work in bed, he says, and try to work in a different room than your bedroom if possible.

2.) Sleep is crucial right now

Sleep is the time our body repairs itself making it a vital part of a healthy immune system. But with schedules out-of-order, the long hours inside can make falling asleep difficult. Things like exercise throughout your day can help at nighttime, and Dr. Kanodia suggests writing before bed if you are struggling to fall asleep as well as limiting blue light exposure.

If, on the other hand, you find yourself waking up much earlier than usual, he says to simply go about your day, but it’s important not to take naps as they can throw off your sleep cycle.

3.) And so is staying physically active; better yet if you can safely get outdoors

He says that functional medicine is finding that there are even more benefits to the immune system and overall health of the body through doing outdoor activities and being in the sunlight.

“Walking out in nature is even more beneficial if you could. Sunlight, outdoor light, or daylight helps us make Vitamin D, helps us shutdown sleeping hormones, and helps with depression.”

However, there is a limit to exercise. He warns that if you feel tired roughly two hours after a work-out, you might’ve overworked yourself. Be cautious as being overworked can lead to a lowered immune system.

4.) Continue social distancing, but use technology to stay connected and close with loved ones

Dr. Kanodia suggests folks use applications like FaceTime and Zoom to stay in-touch with their families and friends. KanodiaMD also offers video chats—both in groups or solo—for anyone with questions or struggling in this time.

He also suggests alternative ways to do this such as video games and online games. Additionally, forums and chats are great ways to stay connected, he says.

5.) Keep a positive outlook with healthy outlets

It’s difficult to do so in times like these, but Dr. Kanodia says a positive outlook is vital right now. And having a positive attitude doesn’t mean you are immune to the fears, rather, it’s coming to terms with them, he says.

“We have to accept our fear, [being] overwhelmed, and anxiousness. […] Stress and mindset are unmet expectations. If I have expectations of how long this will last, if I will get COVID-19, that I don’t like working from home; any of these expectations make us more stressed. If I go with the flow, what’s the best I can do with this one minute? And keep going down that path.”

For this, he suggests finding hobbies that brought you joy when you were younger. For some it’s adult coloring, for others it’s sports.

“Figure out in the past what kept you calm. Whatever it is that is your stress reliever, now is a good time to do it.”

For more information on Dr. Kanodia, or to download his free COVID-19, Cold, and Flu Top 3 Recommendations, visit kanodiamd.com.

© 2020 614 Media Group. All Rights Reserved.

Scroll To Top
X