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COVID-19 Coverage: Expert tips for staying healthy during your stay-at home

Mitch Hooper

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It’s been nine days since Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine has placed the state under a shelter-in-place order. However long this will last is unknown, but Dr. Anup Kanodia has a suggestion: use this time for your own self-health.

Dr. Kanodia, an Akron-native, is the owner and head MD at KanodiaMD in Westerville. He did a fellowship of alternative, integrative medicine at Harvard University and went on to earn his Master’s in Public Health. His practice focuses on integrating functional medicine with conventional medicine. In addition to owning his own private practice, he works part-time with addiction clinics and part-time with urgent care.

“What we’re finding, in my practice, is that a lot of people want to know how do they help themselves in this time. What can they do beyond social distancing and hand washing?” Dr. Kanodia said.

To find ways to cope and grow through this situation, 614Now talked with Dr. Kanodia via Zoom. Here are some of his tips to finding happiness and peace during these stressful times.

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1.) Get into a routine

Working, sleeping, living, and eating in the same place can make the days feel like they blur together. Dr. Kanodia says a daily routine can be exactly what you need to help create a separation of your work and personal life as they collide together at home.

“[It starts] with having a regular sleep schedule,” Dr. Kanodia explained. “And then getting out of the house first thing in the morning; meaning go for a walk, or go get something. But if you’re stuck inside the house all day long, that’s going to ruin your mental health.”

For folks working at home, he also suggests making your work space separate from your bedroom. Don’t work in bed, he says, and try to work in a different room than your bedroom if possible.

2.) Sleep is crucial right now

Sleep is the time our body repairs itself making it a vital part of a healthy immune system. But with schedules out-of-order, the long hours inside can make falling asleep difficult. Things like exercise throughout your day can help at nighttime, and Dr. Kanodia suggests writing before bed if you are struggling to fall asleep as well as limiting blue light exposure.

If, on the other hand, you find yourself waking up much earlier than usual, he says to simply go about your day, but it’s important not to take naps as they can throw off your sleep cycle.

3.) And so is staying physically active; better yet if you can safely get outdoors

He says that functional medicine is finding that there are even more benefits to the immune system and overall health of the body through doing outdoor activities and being in the sunlight.

“Walking out in nature is even more beneficial if you could. Sunlight, outdoor light, or daylight helps us make Vitamin D, helps us shutdown sleeping hormones, and helps with depression.”

However, there is a limit to exercise. He warns that if you feel tired roughly two hours after a work-out, you might’ve overworked yourself. Be cautious as being overworked can lead to a lowered immune system.

4.) Continue social distancing, but use technology to stay connected and close with loved ones

Dr. Kanodia suggests folks use applications like FaceTime and Zoom to stay in-touch with their families and friends. KanodiaMD also offers video chats—both in groups or solo—for anyone with questions or struggling in this time.

He also suggests alternative ways to do this such as video games and online games. Additionally, forums and chats are great ways to stay connected, he says.

5.) Keep a positive outlook with healthy outlets

It’s difficult to do so in times like these, but Dr. Kanodia says a positive outlook is vital right now. And having a positive attitude doesn’t mean you are immune to the fears, rather, it’s coming to terms with them, he says.

“We have to accept our fear, [being] overwhelmed, and anxiousness. […] Stress and mindset are unmet expectations. If I have expectations of how long this will last, if I will get COVID-19, that I don’t like working from home; any of these expectations make us more stressed. If I go with the flow, what’s the best I can do with this one minute? And keep going down that path.”

For this, he suggests finding hobbies that brought you joy when you were younger. For some it’s adult coloring, for others it’s sports.

“Figure out in the past what kept you calm. Whatever it is that is your stress reliever, now is a good time to do it.”

For more information on Dr. Kanodia, or to download his free COVID-19, Cold, and Flu Top 3 Recommendations, visit kanodiamd.com.

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Health & Fitness

Former OSU Linebacker partners with local CBD Company

Julian Foglietti

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Former Ohio State University All-American linebacker, and NFL Fox analyst, Chris Spielman has announced a partnership with CBD Health Collection. Speilman was first introduced to the company while looking for solutions to his “nagging pain”, the result of injuries sustained throughout his football career. CBD Health Collection was founded in 2017 by Rick Bauer in conjunction with his son and daughter who run production and marketing respectively.

In conjunction with the new partnership, CBD Health Collection will be launching a Spielman branded line of CBD products targeted at former athletes and weekend warriors experiencing residual pain from sports. The new products will initially be available online as the company finalizes their retail distribution plans. 

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It’s no longer necessary to do squats outside of your gym, for now

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Gym rats rejoice! Those who’ve been missing the arduousness of wiping down salty equipment after each use or hoping that they come across some top-secret CIA information on the lockerroom floor are in luck.

Since the closing of all non-essential business on March 24, gyms have been void of protein shakes and Affliction t-shirts. Following a court order on Tuesday, workout facilities are now allowed to open their doors earlier than the previous May 26 ruling. Those who were adamant about getting leg day in while also exercising their first amendment rights will no longer have to do so outside of gym complexes.

Lake County Common Pleas Judge Eugene Lucci ruled on Tuesday that state and county health officials, including Ohio Director of Public Health Dr. Amy Acton and the Lake County General Health District, won’t be able to take any action against fitness facilities violating the original reopening date. This comes following a complaint filed by The 1851 Center for Constitutional Law on behalf of 35 Ohio gyms, including Columbus’ Ohio Strength.

The general public would be harmed if an injunction was not granted. There would be a diminishment of public morale and a feeling that one unelected individual could exercise such unfettered power to force everyone to obey," Lucci wrote in the injunction

"The public would be left with feelings that their government is not accountable to them. Prolonged lockdowns have deleterious effects upon the public psyche."

When Lt. Gov. Jon Husted announced several opening days this past Thursday, guidelines that gyms would have to follow to remain open were also outlined. Gyms, fitness centers, and dance studios must keep employees and clients six feet apart, which also includes equipment. Upon entering these facilities, everyone will be asked to wash their hands or use hand sanitizer. 

Fitness facilities will not be asked to close if they follow these guidelines.

This doesn’t mark the end of the lawsuit, though. Restrictions placed on fitness centers are being temporality lifted while the case makes its way through the court system. A successful lawsuit, however, could mean that gyms could sue the state for lost income.

“The ruling by Judge Eugene Lucci of the Lake County Court of Common Pleas explains that private property rights are fundamental rights in Ohio, and that the Ohio Department of Health has both violated those rights and exceeded its own authority,” according to a statement from Cincinnati-based Finney Law Firm.

Photo by: WKYC Channel 3
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Pelotonia launches virtual program for 2020 event

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For the past 12 years, Pelotonia has raised hundreds of millions of dollars for cancer research with an annual three-day bicycle race. Due to current social distancing measures, riders will not be able to gather this year to trek across central and southern Ohio.

The non-profit cancer research organization, though,  has found a way to allow riders to participate virtually. Launching on June 2, My Pelotonia will allow participants to set their own fundraising and biking goals for the year in place of the three-day event. A fundraising requirement will not be required. 

“While so much has recently changed, the need for critical research funding and the goal of Pelotonia has not,” said Doug Ulman, Pelotonia President and CEO.

“My Pelotonia will be an experience that is more inclusive and personal with more ways to engage and participate than ever before.”

My Pelotonia is also encouraging families to participate. To make this more possible, Pelotonia has waived registration fees and an age requirement. The fundraising deadline has also been extended until October 31.

The program is also encouraging people to not just exercise on their bikes. Running, walking, and volunteering are just some of the activities that count toward a rider’s personal goal.

In lieu of the traditional Pelotonia Opening Ceremony, a live broadcast celebration will be held on August 7.

100 percent of every dollar raised will go toward providing critical funds for cancer research at the OSUCCC-James.

Photos by Pelotonia


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