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Stay safe and do good for Earth Day 2020

Mike Thomas

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Like just about everything else, Earth Day looks a little different this year. Glancing back at our coverage of 2019’s festivities really sends home just how much can change in one year.

So no promos from local restaurants or brewers. No gathering in large group settings to clean up your local community. That doesn’t mean Earth Day is cancelled—in fact, this could be the best one yet. When have you had this kind of time on your hands to do something nice for the planet we call home?

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From info on growing your own pollinator garden to cultivating microgreens, earthdaycolumbus.org is an incredible resource for handy tips to bring a little green into your life for Earth Day and beyond. Did you know you can get a $50 rebate on a rain barrel to help conserve water for your lawn and garden needs? Just the kind of helpful info you’ll find at earthdaycolumbus.org, along with much more.

Of course, no Earth Day in Columbus would be complete without a stop at North Star Cafe. While free burgers are out of the picture this year for obvious reasons, you should still plan a visit to your nearest North Star location for their first ever “Carryout Earth Day.” All proceeds from burgers sold today will go directly to North Star team members who have been impacted by the COVID-19 crisis, so let’s all dig deep for the folks who have been there to give us FREE FOOD on every other Earth Day we can remember. (To promote social distancing, orders for this event are online only. For more info, visit North Star on Facebook.)

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Lifestyle

Organize Your Life: Bullet Journaling

Julian Foglietti

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After three months of isolation, and the general productivity lull it created, I began searching for a way to bring some structure back into my life. After a week of stumbling through various self-help forums, I came across the world of Bullet Journaling.  Originally developed by Ryder Carroll, a NYC Product Designer.

Bullet Journaling works by allowing the rapid listing of thoughts, tasks, and events. In its simplest form, it allows you to organize the quick, fleeting ideas we have and go back through, organizing them at the end of the day. As the name suggests, Bullet Journaling relies on bullet points as the main method of organizing information. Each point acts as a reference to a thought. However, unlike other task management methods, one of the biggest aspects of Bullet Journaling is reflecting on what was written over the course of the day, and transferring what's essential to the next day. It’s this aspect of reflection that has proven to be so effective for me.

As a journalist I often find myself juggling multiple stories at different stages of progress. Bullet Journaling has allowed me to prioritize each of these stories and their deadlines. Where I once had pages of random scribbles, I now have a system to easily find and reflect upon all the information I’m constantly intaking.

How to make your own Bullet Journal:

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Health & Fitness

Former OSU Linebacker partners with local CBD Company

Julian Foglietti

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Former Ohio State University All-American linebacker, and NFL Fox analyst, Chris Spielman has announced a partnership with CBD Health Collection. Speilman was first introduced to the company while looking for solutions to his “nagging pain”, the result of injuries sustained throughout his football career. CBD Health Collection was founded in 2017 by Rick Bauer in conjunction with his son and daughter who run production and marketing respectively.

In conjunction with the new partnership, CBD Health Collection will be launching a Spielman branded line of CBD products targeted at former athletes and weekend warriors experiencing residual pain from sports. The new products will initially be available online as the company finalizes their retail distribution plans. 

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Health & Fitness

It’s no longer necessary to do squats outside of your gym, for now

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Gym rats rejoice! Those who’ve been missing the arduousness of wiping down salty equipment after each use or hoping that they come across some top-secret CIA information on the lockerroom floor are in luck.

Since the closing of all non-essential business on March 24, gyms have been void of protein shakes and Affliction t-shirts. Following a court order on Tuesday, workout facilities are now allowed to open their doors earlier than the previous May 26 ruling. Those who were adamant about getting leg day in while also exercising their first amendment rights will no longer have to do so outside of gym complexes.

Lake County Common Pleas Judge Eugene Lucci ruled on Tuesday that state and county health officials, including Ohio Director of Public Health Dr. Amy Acton and the Lake County General Health District, won’t be able to take any action against fitness facilities violating the original reopening date. This comes following a complaint filed by The 1851 Center for Constitutional Law on behalf of 35 Ohio gyms, including Columbus’ Ohio Strength.

The general public would be harmed if an injunction was not granted. There would be a diminishment of public morale and a feeling that one unelected individual could exercise such unfettered power to force everyone to obey," Lucci wrote in the injunction

"The public would be left with feelings that their government is not accountable to them. Prolonged lockdowns have deleterious effects upon the public psyche."

When Lt. Gov. Jon Husted announced several opening days this past Thursday, guidelines that gyms would have to follow to remain open were also outlined. Gyms, fitness centers, and dance studios must keep employees and clients six feet apart, which also includes equipment. Upon entering these facilities, everyone will be asked to wash their hands or use hand sanitizer. 

Fitness facilities will not be asked to close if they follow these guidelines.

This doesn’t mark the end of the lawsuit, though. Restrictions placed on fitness centers are being temporality lifted while the case makes its way through the court system. A successful lawsuit, however, could mean that gyms could sue the state for lost income.

“The ruling by Judge Eugene Lucci of the Lake County Court of Common Pleas explains that private property rights are fundamental rights in Ohio, and that the Ohio Department of Health has both violated those rights and exceeded its own authority,” according to a statement from Cincinnati-based Finney Law Firm.

Photo by: WKYC Channel 3
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