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Grove City Brewing Co.

614now Staff

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$20 per diner

Tax, gratuity, and beverages not included


 

First Course (choose one)

CHEESE CURDS
White Cheddar Cheese Curds + GCBC Beer Batter + Chipotle Ranch

PRETZEL BITES
House Fried Pretzel + GCBC Beer Cheese Sauce + Honey Mustard

GLASS OF HOUSE BEER OR WINE
Select any pint of House Beer or glass of House Wine


 

Second Course (choose one)

BBQ PULLED PORK SANDWICH
Roasted Pulled Pork + Apple Coleslaw + BBQ Sauce + Kettle Chips

CAJUN CHICKEN SANDWICH
Grilled Chicken + Grilled Pineapple + Lettuce + Red Onion + Bourbon Glaze + House Fries

SOUTHWEST SALAD W/ BBQ CHICKEN
Grilled BBQ Chicken Breast + Mixed Greens + Avocado + Black Bean Corn Salsa + Julienne Tomatoes + Red Onions + White Cheddar Cheese + Tortilla Strips + Chipotle Ranch


 

Third Course (choose one)

FRUIT DRUNK POPSICLE #1
Plum Run Winery Sweet Wine Selection + Puree’d Strawberries + Chocolate Dipped

FRUIT DRUNK POPSICLE #2
Plum Run Winery Cabernet Wine + Lemonade + Puree’d Raspberries + Sugar Dipped

KEY LIME PIE CHEESECAKE
Key Lime Pie Cheesecake


 

Grove City Brewing Company 

3946 Broadway

Grove City, OH 43123

(614) 991-0338

 

Menu Hours

Monday – Thursday: 11a-10p

Friday – Saturday: 11a-12a

 

 

COMMUNITY PARTNERS

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things to do

Obscure Columbus: Brown Pet Cemetery

Laura Dachenbach

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I drove past it dozens of times before I realized what it was. 

I could see that it was a cemetery peeking out from under an overhang of trees, with stones spreading across a field. But something was different. One day while driving down Sawyer Road, I slowed down until I could make out a name on what seemed to be a very small marker: Pug. 

I had found the Brown Pet Cemetery. 

Surrounded by the grounds of the John Glenn Airport, the Brown Pet Cemetery remains mostly hidden. The cemetery was started in the 1920s by Walter A. Brown, a local veterinarian, and a cemetery association was founded in 1934. Over 450 burials cover the site, all a visual testament to the purity of the human-animal bond. Most markers bear the names not only of the pets themselves, but also of their human “parents.” Folk art decorates many stones, as well as oval ceramic plaques with black-and-white pet portraits. DIYers of decades ago have used marbles and shells to adorn handmade markers.

Pet names over the decades show their cultural and historical influences. Dimples and Trixie and Buster in the 20s and 30s give way to Lassie and Gidget in the 50s and eventually become Coco and Misty in the 70s and 80s. But pet owners have clearly always been common or creative in naming their animal companions. For every Blackie or Fluffy that rests here, there’s a Boob and a Stinky Bill and a Dammit, each of them memorialized and apparently cherished. 

It’s hard to tell how active the cemetery is. The articles of incorporation for the cemetery association expired in 1997, when most burials seemed to have stopped. However, during my most recent excursion through the grounds, I saw several graves marked with artificial flowers, as well as a memorial for Mr. King, a ten-year-old cat with a love of shoes, who was interred this past June. 

Regardless of activity, the sentimentality of this space is palpable. (A visit will likely require a package of Kleenex.) Be ready to be touched by the still-visible memories of the pets who have found peace here.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HX4wcHqlUS4#action=share
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Health & Fitness

Truth or Trend: Late night eats at Steak ‘n’ Shake

Becca Kirian RD, LD, CNSC

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Waist trainers, crash diets, colon cleanses—all things touted as the next miracle solution for weight loss. With the help of our new Registered Dietitian columnist, we’ll sort out the truth from the trash when it comes to health trends on your social media feeds, and provide healthy, sustainable alternatives for those to-good-to-be-true fixes. Welcome to Truth or Trend.

Steak ‘n’ Shake; a long-standing staple for a greasy, late night bite to eat. While "Eat This, Not That!" calls their signature items “two of the most precarious foods on the planet” on Instagram, is their fear mongering all it claims to be? Stick with me as I explore the truth behind a post by the account comparing the healthiness of two popular menu items: a Single Steakburger with Thin 'n Crispy Fries v. Portobello and a Swiss Steakburger.

https://www.instagram.com/p/Bw_IR1_h2Ol/?igshid=1s0nzocal4f4w

First, the nutrition information provided for the two options shown in the post is inaccurate (click here to see more). Additionally, the caption claims most shakes are more than 500 calories and most salad options are 600 calories or less which is an incorrect generalization.

And while the Single Steakburger with Thin 'n Crispy Fries is the lower-calorie option like "Eat This, Not That!" says, what the post doesn’t account for are some other important nutrient factors that set the two options apart.

The Single Steakburger with Thin 'n Crispy Fries combination has 1380 mg sodium, which is 60% of the maximum recommended daily intake (2300 mg) in one meal, compared to just 890 in the Portobello and Swiss burger. The “Not this” option also boasts a higher protein content of 29 g compared to 17 g in the combination and about half the carbohydrates at 36 g v. 62 g.

Take-away

There are pros and cons to each of the menu items here, so saying to “Eat this, not that” is painting broad strokes. If you’re a patron of fast food chains, remember to review and weigh all the nutritional facts before making a decision about which one is "healthier." Or, if you’re out for a special late night treat, choose the option that is going to satisfy you!

Becca is an Ohio native and University of Cincinnati graduate who works as a traveling consultant dietitian, currently living in Juneau, Alaska. She owns Centum Cento Fitness LLC, a company dedicated to using evidenced-based practice to help empower clients to build sustainable and healthy lifestyles through nutrition and fitness.Follow Becca on Instagram!

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Food & Drink

Brand new concept opening today in former CBC Restaurant

Regina Fox

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The CBC Restaurant successor will finally take the helm today. Matt & Tony's Wood Fired Kitchen is open now at 525 Short St.

Matt & Tony’s Wood Fired Kitchen will focus on contemporary American cuisine and craft cocktails in an eclectic space, according to a release. This is a spinoff concept from Pat & Gracie's Downtown co-owners Matt Rootes and Tony Wildman.

"We believe that there is a need downtown for prime steaks and great seafood at a reasonable price,” said Rootes. “We’re committing to excellent food and service in a relaxed and fun atmosphere with plenty of free parking available.”

Since the CBC Restaurant closed back in July 2018, the space has undergone extensive renovation to better suit the contemporary Matt & Tony's brand.

After announcing the closure, CBC Restaurant planned to rebrand as Oxbow on Short. However, severe health issues rendered one owner, Doug Griggs, incapable of continuing.

Mat & Tony’s is open for lunch and dinner seven days a week with most menu items under $20. Hours are 11am- 10pm Sunday through Thursday and 11am- 11pm Friday and Saturday.

More information can be found at mattandtonys.com.

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