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Joke-o-Matic

Want to be a stand-up comic? you'll be on comedy central in no time* with JOKE-O-MATIC! The steps are so easy you can do them without the support of any family or friends! 1. Pick the type of comic you’d like to be from the three stereotypes below. 2. Without peaking at the jokes (in [...]
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Want to be a stand-up comic? you’ll be on comedy central in no time* with JOKE-O-MATIC!

The steps are so easy you can do them without the support of any family or friends!

1. Pick the type of comic you’d like to be from the three stereotypes below.

2. Without peaking at the jokes (in blue) below, answer the prompts with the first thing that comes to mind.

3. Fill out the corresponding spaces in the joke below.

4. Perform at an open mic, and you probably won’t be the worst or craziest one there.



 

The creative kids at (614) are growing up and moving out.

Three months after our beloved design wiz Laura Sanders left the building, she now departs on a new creative journey—in a new city.

While she wasn’t toiling away in the bowels of our offices, Laura the stand-up comedian was honing her craft on stages in Columbus and beyond, landing feature spots on Fox’s LaughsTV, and in such acclaimed lineups as Chicago’s Comedians You Should Know, LA’s Hot Tub with Kurt and Kristen, Bloomington’s Limestone Comedy Festival, Wilmington’s Cape Fear Comedy Festival, and New York’s She Devil Comedy Festival.

In between honoring design assignments that ranged from the outlandish to the near-impossible, Laura also performed three one-woman shows live and recorded her first stand-up
album, Ohio Built Lady.

Now, she’ll take on the task of recording her second album before a hometown audience, leaving us with one last little bit of Laura before she heads off to New Orleans to, “See how weird it gets there.”

She’ll do so on the main stage of the city’s historic Garden Theater, joined by fellow soon-to-be-former-Columbus comedian Michael Meyers, who is plotting his path to Chicago after their send-off special, “I’ll Leave You With This.”

Michael has spent the last five years in the city honing his dark, silly, oddball material to become one of the finer comedians Columbus has to offer, a stark change from the early days, when he was assaulted by women after shows on two separate occasions (one woman attacked with her hand in the form of a slap, and the other with a lemon that missed the intended target by approximately 10 feet to the left). Between attacks, Meyers has performed all over the Midwest, been a finalist in the Columbus Funny Bone’s Talent Search and Go Banana’s Funniest Person in Cincinnati Contest, and helped produce the fifth and sixth Columbus Comedy Festivals.

In addition to one last hurrah on stage, both offered to leave a little extra comedy behind in the form of their Joke-a-Matic (patent pending), a fill-in-the-blank MadLib-style workbook for you to create your own brilliant bits.

When you’re done, you can throw lemons at yourself.



I’ll Leave You With This: The Send-off Special

September 1, 2015  at the Garden Theater

1187 N High St, Columbus, OH 43201

Doors open: 6:30pm, Show Runs: 7:30 – 9:30pm

IllLeaveYouWithThis.com, Tickets $15-$25

To purchase I’ll Leave You With This: The Send-off Special tickets, download Joke-O-Matic printouts, or to enter your joke for a chance to win free tickets, visit IllLeaveYouWithThis.com

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Arts & Culture

Ohio animator creates tribute, parody video of DeWine & Acton

Wayne T. Lewis

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Video at bottom of story

About three weeks ago, when the world was starting to fall apart, Dave Stofka was looking for something to take his mind off the stream of daily bad news. A freelance web developer and animator since 2007, Stofka had just the idea.

"I watched Governor DeWine and Dr. Acton's press conferences, and all the Facebook comments I was reading conveyed a sense of great appreciation of their leadership. At some point I jokingly thought to myself that all they need is a theme song. Growing up in the days when every show had a theme song, the "Laverne & Shirley" theme popped into my head for some reason, said Stofka.

With some encouragement from his wife, he dug into the project putting to work his previous experience making animated parodies. Stofka says he put about 100 hours over 2.5 weeks into the video project.

"I knew technically how to pull it off. The jokes started flowing the more I worked on it and bounced ideas off my family and a couple friends. It snowballed from there," said Stofka.

The 1:20 video offers a light-hearted take on the state government's efforts - led by DeWine and Acton - in combating the coronavirus pandemic. The video is based on a hilarious take on the "Laverne & Shirley" theme song, performed by Stofka's friend, Elisa Grecar.

"My goal in this was to bring smiles to people's faces. It's so easy to focus on the negative and difficult to focus on the positive -- not just in times like this but in life in general. I love that Ohio's motto is "With God, all things are possible" -- it made a perfect tagline at the end -- and personally it has given me a lot of hope to get through this," added Stofka.

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Comedy

Transition Stage

In the standup comedy world, it’s a long-held goal of many young comics to build their act to where they finally get to “be themselves” on stage. You can take that premise and multiply it by 10 for Columbus native Riley Silverman. Coming up through the underground basement open mic and suburban one-nighter scene, Silverman [...]
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In the standup comedy world, it’s a long-held goal of many young comics to build their act to where they finally get to “be themselves” on stage.

You can take that premise and multiply it by 10 for Columbus native Riley Silverman.

Coming up through the underground basement open mic and suburban one-nighter scene, Silverman was not unlike any other Ohio comic, talking about the foibles of Midwestern life, but in 2009, she reached a dual breakthrough on-stage and off.

Comedy, as it turns out, facilitated coming out as trans for Silverman.

“I went from being someone viewing the world from a place that was inherently false, to being someone who was being completely open,” said Silverman, who moved to Los Angeles in 2010. “I was getting so much more honest and open in my act and I eventually just a hit a wall where if I didn’t do it, I would just be stuck in the same place forever.”

Since then, Silverman has been far from stuck in one place. With a full-length album under her belt (Intimate Apparel), as well as a recent appearance on Comedy Central’s Not Safe with Nikki Glaser, she's’ become a staple in the L.A. scene, and through her personal website (rileysilverman.tumblr.com) and Twitter page (@ryesilverman) she's also become a loud voice for the trans community beyond her local area code.

Ahead of her return appearance this month at Shadowbox Live’s Backstage Bistro, Silverman let (614) go backstage with her thoughts.

Where does the current standup world grade in terms of misogyny and transphobia?

I think we’re really in a sea of change. I think not just as a trans woman, but in general the world of stand-up is finally getting swarmed with so many different voices, it’s an amazing time to be part of it. There’s all this backlash against comedy being too safe or too politically correct, but I don’t see it that way. I see it as people who were previously kept quiet finally pushing those voices out there.

Recently that you performed and visited around your hometown as out. Can you describe the feelings that flooded you during those times? Your parents got you Star Wars makeup for Christmas, which must have been surreal...

SO surreal. Yeah, getting that makeup from my parents made me tear up Christmas morning. What is happening with me is difficult for them to understand, and we butt heads on it sometimes, but that was like a shining beacon of awareness that they do ultimately still love me and we’re gonna adjust to our new normal.

As far as the rest... there’s the saying “you can’t go home again,” and I am that to an extreme. I came out in Columbus but hadn’t decided to transition yet, but coming back now when I’m openly living as a woman, and with a different name, it’s like I came back as a different person, and the city is so different too. Whenever I come home it’s like I’m living a weird reboot film of my life. I’m Ghostbusters.

Or trading bra talk with Nikki Glaser…

Ha! That was actually strangely very comfortable and relaxed. It was funny because I met Nikki at the FunnyBone like eight years ago when I was still closeted, and we hadn’t seen each other since but kept in touch via the internet. When I got to set for the episode, the director actually purposefully kept us apart because he wanted us to reunite on camera. But I don’t know, maybe it’s the special bond of road comics, but it felt like we picked up right where we left off.

Have the comics that you look up to or admire changed as your life has?

Oh definitely. I think a lot of that is moving to LA and having a new pool of peers and influences. When I first started in Columbus in 2001, there weren’t a lot of female comics, a situation that has thankfully changed. There really weren’t any women in the generation of established comics before me to look up to. Eventually there were some amazing talents in my peer group like Laura Sanders and Nickey Winkelman, which was great, but most of the comedic role models I had were still men. But as a female comic in LA, I’ve got an embarrassment of riches in talented ladies to admire and now that’s who populates the list of comics I’m eager and excited to see. Comics like Maria Bamford, Eliza Skinner, Jackie Kashian or Beth Stelling for example—who is an Ohio girl too!

You’ve become a very active fighter of transphobia and injustice. Is that a hard thing to balance on social media as a woman who is passionate about equality and has a voice, but also someone who loves silly shit and making fun of pop culture?

The weirdest tweet to send is the first silly joke after going on a bit of a rant. I’ve actually had to actively kind of take a step back from it a little bit, really think about what I want to put out into the world energy wise. It can get really easy to get caught up in online arguments, and fighting can be pretty toxic mentally. I still believe very much in equality and social justice, but I just try to consider where my voice would be the most useful. I think it’s through comedy. A lot of people like to use the term “Social Justice Warrior” as a pejorative, but I tend to think of myself as a “Social Justice Bard.” My goal, and I’m not saying I’ve achieved this, is to sell my vision of the world through silly shit and pop culture jokes.

After years of feeling that your assigned gender didn’t fit your true gender, is it borderline surreal now to write jokes and find humor in your everyday activities more associated with females?

It was at first, I think I’ve settled into a good place with that though. When I first came out I was paranoid about being “too trans” in my material, I didn’t want my marginalized status to become my entire act so I’d limit how much of it I could talk about. But now that I’m past the point where everything is new and exciting, now this is just my life so that’s the filter through which I view the world and write comedy.

Who is the modern-day ally for the trans community?

Funny story about that, when I was home for Christmas, I did comedy at the FunnyBone for really the first time openly as woman, and was really excited about how well the show went. Afterwards, my friend Maria and I went to the mall restroom which I was SUPER nervous about—this was even before “bathroom bills” were a major national distract— er, topic. So I’m in the stall, actually a bit nervous and wishing I’d gone back to the club, and Maria is washing her hands at the sink when a loud drunk lady comes in and seems to be looking for me. So I get really tense and stay in the stall till she finally leaves. And Maria gets tense because she’s thinking she may have to get defensive for me in a second. Then the lady leaves. Then we do. And as we’re walking through the mall, this same lady sees me, stops me, and it turns out she had just been at the show and enjoyed my set and was trying to come get me to join her group for drinks. I think that’s the ideal ally. Someone who wants to buy me drinks. Or, at least just views me as a person instead of something that they have to deal with.

Is this the year Riley Silverman blows up, considering it’s prime time for the trans community and nerd girls are way in?

Riley Silverman is definitely blowing up this year, but that has more to do with chicken fingers and cheeseburgers than anything.

Silverman performs at Shadowbox September 6.

Editor's note: An unedited version of this story was printed earlier, resulting in a misgendering of the subject's identity. We apologize for the error(s) and will print an extended retraction in our next upcoming print issue.

Continue Reading

Comedy

Transition Stage

In the standup comedy world, it’s a long-held goal of many young comics to build their act to where they finally get to “be themselves” on stage. You can take that premise and multiply it by 10 for Columbus native Riley Silverman. Coming up through the underground basement open mic and suburban one-nighter scene, Silverman [...]
614now Staff

Published

on

In the standup comedy world, it’s a long-held goal of many young comics to build their act to where they finally get to “be themselves” on stage.

You can take that premise and multiply it by 10 for Columbus native Riley Silverman.

Coming up through the underground basement open mic and suburban one-nighter scene, Silverman was not unlike any other Ohio comic, talking about the foibles of Midwestern life, but in 2009, she reached a dual breakthrough on-stage and off.

Comedy, as it turns out, facilitated coming out as trans for Silverman.

“I went from being someone viewing the world from a place that was inherently false, to being someone who was being completely open,” said Silverman, who moved to Los Angeles in 2010. “I was getting so much more honest and open in my act and I eventually just a hit a wall where if I didn’t do it, I would just be stuck in the same place forever.”

Since then, Silverman has been far from stuck in one place. With a full-length album under her belt (Intimate Apparel), as well as a recent appearance on Comedy Central’s Not Safe with Nikki Glaser, she's’ become a staple in the L.A. scene, and through her personal website (rileysilverman.tumblr.com) and Twitter page (@ryesilverman) she's also become a loud voice for the trans community beyond her local area code.

Ahead of her return appearance this month at Shadowbox Live’s Backstage Bistro, Silverman let (614) go backstage with her thoughts.

Where does the current standup world grade in terms of misogyny and transphobia?

I think we’re really in a sea of change. I think not just as a trans woman, but in general the world of stand-up is finally getting swarmed with so many different voices, it’s an amazing time to be part of it. There’s all this backlash against comedy being too safe or too politically correct, but I don’t see it that way. I see it as people who were previously kept quiet finally pushing those voices out there.

Recently that you performed and visited around your hometown as out. Can you describe the feelings that flooded you during those times? Your parents got you Star Wars makeup for Christmas, which must have been surreal...

SO surreal. Yeah, getting that makeup from my parents made me tear up Christmas morning. What is happening with me is difficult for them to understand, and we butt heads on it sometimes, but that was like a shining beacon of awareness that they do ultimately still love me and we’re gonna adjust to our new normal.

As far as the rest... there’s the saying “you can’t go home again,” and I am that to an extreme. I came out in Columbus but hadn’t decided to transition yet, but coming back now when I’m openly living as a woman, and with a different name, it’s like I came back as a different person, and the city is so different too. Whenever I come home it’s like I’m living a weird reboot film of my life. I’m Ghostbusters.

Or trading bra talk with Nikki Glaser…

Ha! That was actually strangely very comfortable and relaxed. It was funny because I met Nikki at the FunnyBone like eight years ago when I was still closeted, and we hadn’t seen each other since but kept in touch via the internet. When I got to set for the episode, the director actually purposefully kept us apart because he wanted us to reunite on camera. But I don’t know, maybe it’s the special bond of road comics, but it felt like we picked up right where we left off.

Have the comics that you look up to or admire changed as your life has?

Oh definitely. I think a lot of that is moving to LA and having a new pool of peers and influences. When I first started in Columbus in 2001, there weren’t a lot of female comics, a situation that has thankfully changed. There really weren’t any women in the generation of established comics before me to look up to. Eventually there were some amazing talents in my peer group like Laura Sanders and Nickey Winkelman, which was great, but most of the comedic role models I had were still men. But as a female comic in LA, I’ve got an embarrassment of riches in talented ladies to admire and now that’s who populates the list of comics I’m eager and excited to see. Comics like Maria Bamford, Eliza Skinner, Jackie Kashian or Beth Stelling for example—who is an Ohio girl too!

You’ve become a very active fighter of transphobia and injustice. Is that a hard thing to balance on social media as a woman who is passionate about equality and has a voice, but also someone who loves silly shit and making fun of pop culture?

The weirdest tweet to send is the first silly joke after going on a bit of a rant. I’ve actually had to actively kind of take a step back from it a little bit, really think about what I want to put out into the world energy wise. It can get really easy to get caught up in online arguments, and fighting can be pretty toxic mentally. I still believe very much in equality and social justice, but I just try to consider where my voice would be the most useful. I think it’s through comedy. A lot of people like to use the term “Social Justice Warrior” as a pejorative, but I tend to think of myself as a “Social Justice Bard.” My goal, and I’m not saying I’ve achieved this, is to sell my vision of the world through silly shit and pop culture jokes.

After years of feeling that your assigned gender didn’t fit your true gender, is it borderline surreal now to write jokes and find humor in your everyday activities more associated with females?

It was at first, I think I’ve settled into a good place with that though. When I first came out I was paranoid about being “too trans” in my material, I didn’t want my marginalized status to become my entire act so I’d limit how much of it I could talk about. But now that I’m past the point where everything is new and exciting, now this is just my life so that’s the filter through which I view the world and write comedy.

Who is the modern-day ally for the trans community?

Funny story about that, when I was home for Christmas, I did comedy at the FunnyBone for really the first time openly as woman, and was really excited about how well the show went. Afterwards, my friend Maria and I went to the mall restroom which I was SUPER nervous about—this was even before “bathroom bills” were a major national distract— er, topic. So I’m in the stall, actually a bit nervous and wishing I’d gone back to the club, and Maria is washing her hands at the sink when a loud drunk lady comes in and seems to be looking for me. So I get really tense and stay in the stall till she finally leaves. And Maria gets tense because she’s thinking she may have to get defensive for me in a second. Then the lady leaves. Then we do. And as we’re walking through the mall, this same lady sees me, stops me, and it turns out she had just been at the show and enjoyed my set and was trying to come get me to join her group for drinks. I think that’s the ideal ally. Someone who wants to buy me drinks. Or, at least just views me as a person instead of something that they have to deal with.

Is this the year Riley Silverman blows up, considering it’s prime time for the trans community and nerd girls are way in?

Riley Silverman is definitely blowing up this year, but that has more to do with chicken fingers and cheeseburgers than anything.

Silverman performs at Shadowbox September 6.

Editor's note: An unedited version of this story was printed earlier, resulting in a misgendering of the subject's identity. We apologize for the error(s) and will print an extended retraction in our next upcoming print issue.

Continue Reading
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