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Lookin’ Good Enough to Eat

At Stock & Barrel, how can we not be in love with people who see deep dish pizza and match it with a thrift store sweater in their head, or two people who could say the phrase “filet-o-fish blue” and not have to explain further? Michelle Maguire and Kelsey McClellan are our kind of people. [...]
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At Stock & Barrel, how can we not be in love with people who see deep dish pizza and match it with a thrift store sweater in their head, or two people who could say the phrase “filet-o-fish blue” and not have to explain further?
Michelle Maguire and Kelsey McClellan are our kind of people.
The stylist and photographer—known collectively as Terrence Caviar—are always mining new possibilities in the world of styling, their imagination on display in their latest collaboration, Wardrobe Snacks.
This is food as art. As fashion. As a powerful agent of nostalgia. As an accessory to its author’s personality.
And we’re fascinated by it.
As a magazine tasked with coming up with new ways to unlock the imagination of the food world visually, we wanted to tip our caps to T. Caviar, and of course, sit down and chop up how something this lovely comes to be.

Photos by Kelsey Mcclellan
Styling by Michelle Maguire

So, tell me where this idea started, you lovely weirdos?
MM: This series was inspired by diners lacking the luxury of being seated at a table: my stepdad who rests his sandwich on his thigh in between bites (hell with a plate!) while he blasts an action movie on his TV; a commuter cramped up on a crowded bus retrieving an item from a bag or pocket; a lunch-breaker on a park bench eating from her lap. They’re informal—perhaps even a bit awkward—spaces as far as eating is concerned, yet the diners always appear to be comfortable and perfectly satisfied with their chosen snack, almost Zen-like.
KM: We’ve been collaborating on another ongoing series, Pancakes is Ready, for a couple of years now. We talk on the phone pretty often about what we want to shoot together the next time we are in the same place, and before shooting Wardrobe Snacks we thought it would be fun to focus on food without using a table surface.

Did they all start the same way? Was the inspiration clothes first and then find some food to match, or other way around?
MM: Along with color, food is another thing that gets me excited, so for Wardrobe Snacks, once I had the clothing picked out, it was fun to think about an edible prop (both color-appropriate and easily eaten on-the-go or from your lap) to become the star of the show. Some of the foods shown (Sicilian-style pizza) are actually my favorite snacks, others (Zero bar) I slip in simply for nostalgic reasons.

Lookin’ Good Enough to Eat

Quick: match a food item with what each of you are wearing right now?
MM: A tangerine.
KM: Blackberries.

In many ways this is a tribute to branding—these classic colors that have been attributed to these products. Particularly that filet-o-fish blue. I remember that packaging, but some may not—yet it’s there, in our psyche. Even the specific pink color of the sugar wafers. Is this in examination of the way we associate food and color and product?
MM; Totally. When I was growing up, the quick fish was served inside a Styrofoam container that was this beautiful ’70s-prom tuxedo-blue. I deeply associate that color with the filet-o’-fish, and it’s the first thing that popped into my head when I found the blue suit at the thrift store. In an effort to modernize, McDonald’s got rid of that packaging years ago, so to incorporate that essential, recognizable blue, we wrapped the sandwich in tissue paper.
KM: I think when you link food to personal memories colors are strongly associated. I used to eat cereal every morning out of these plastic, blush pink bowls that my mom had, so that color still makes me think of breakfast.

Photos by Kelsey Mcclellan
Styling by Michelle Maguire

I like that it’s also a tribute to this notion that “everybody snacks.” Paying homage to that one little thing you sneak into your daily diet—random or consistent, good for you or bad for you. Is that part of the inspiration?
MM: Aside from being such visually appealing props to slip into a composition, I associate food with pleasure. I’m also a big believer in taking breaks—to eat something that brings you joy and comfort, sit outside, get some air, listen to some birds, and re-charge. Stealing a moment to snack is a wise move—keep the bonks at bay.
KM: For sure—everyone snacks. Usually it isn’t dependent on what you are wearing but it’s sorta a fun exercise to pair foods with your clothes. All types of food can bring peace of mind at different times—like when you are starving on a long drive and all you can get is a bag of chips at a gas station, or when you are hustlin’ around town and just have time for the wafer you had in your purse.

Where did you get the clothes? Any local finds?
MM: Columbus is the land of terrific thrift stores and estate sales, so I’m always gathering stuff—objects, clothing, paper ephemera, carpet remnants, you name it—that I think will photograph well. If it’s got nice color, texture, or shape, it’s coming home with me. Styling combines my love of hunting and collecting and organizing and then thinking about ways of arranging those collected objects within a visual frame.

What were your favorite snacks as kids?
MM: After-school slices of salami at my grandma’s house, pepperoni rolls, pizzelles, apple juice.
KM: I had a phase in middle school where I ate a huge bowl (like 5 scoops, no joke) of Breyer’s chocolate ice cream with sliced banana and a can of sprite everyday as soon as I got home. I also ate a lot of clementines.

How about as adults?
MM: Cheese and crackers, anything pickled, olives, kettle chips, corn nuts.
KM: Chocolate — I have a problem.

Photos by Kelsey Mcclellan
Styling by Michelle Maguire

I have to know: what’s the next project from you two? What else is left to explore on fringe world of food styling?
MM: We’re going to keep moving with Wardrobe Snacks, shooting a few more pieces this summer to round out the series while continuing to push its prints, and maybe eventually try to have a show somewhere. Would love to see them big! And a few commissions are happening that we’re excited about. •

 

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Fashion

Short North shop offers convenient ways for men to boost wardrobes

Mitch Hooper

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Fashion trends come in waves, and at the moment in men’s fashion, it seems no wave is bigger than streetwear. It’s a combination of sleekly-designed hoodies and shirts with versatile bottoms. Graphic t-shirts—both long sleeve and short—have found new life with unlikely brands collaborating such as Supreme and Carhartt. It’s no longer a crime to walk out of the house wearing a groutfit (an all-gray outfit) and earth tones provide unique color options. And shoes? It seems shoes show no sign of slowing down as the “rare” value of finding a high end pair of Jordans or Yeezys is a race to the top. If there were a male version of Carrie Bradshaw, he’d be wearing streetwear.

This trend is no secret to our city either. Right in the heart of the Short North is Madison USA, a men’s fashion store with everything from your next favorite crew neck to a pair of shoes that might cost you upwards of $650. It’s all worth it in the end if you get that clout. Our photographer, Zane Osler, hooked us up with a few looks for men this season to get a leg up on the competition. Four Pins, if you’re reading this, put us on your fit watch 2019 list.

Brand: Darryl Brown. Top: White painter coat, $750. Pants: Paint Trouser, $308.
Brand: Aime Leon Dore. Top: Kanga Hoodie Sweatshirt, $137. Hat: Waffle Stitch beanie, $60.
Brand: Aime Leon Dore. Top: Crewneck sweatshirt w/pocket, $112. Pants: Camper pants, $112.

Madison USA is located at 1219 N. High St. For more information and to see what's new, visit madison-usa.com.

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Fashion

Local vintage stores offering old school duds for Buckeye fans

Mitch Hooper

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In the modern age of sports, your fanhood is often defined by your fashion. The variations of ways to support the Buckeyes range from shirtseys—a newcomers go-to for getting a player’s number on their back without shelling out $200 for a jersey—all the way to customized jerseys with your very own last name on the back. And somewhere in between lies a world that Homage has inspired: throwback styles of sporting apparel.

90's SweatShirt: $43 (Photos: Brian Kaiser)

What’s not to love about vintage gear? Compared to an authentic jersey from Nike, you’re saving loads of money without sacrificing style. They often represent an older time of Buckeye athletics that you can wear as a badge of honor which states, “I watched the Woody Hayes days, and I remember John Cooper all too well.” The aforementioned Homage is a great entry point for anyone looking to get in the game, but thrift stores and vintage clothing stores like Smartypants Vintage in the Short North offer even more unique ways to show you bleed scarlet and gray—or at least fit the part.

Left to Right: "Columbuth" t-shirt: $36, 80s Spirograph: $40, Champion t-shirt: $40

We linked up with Smartypants Vintage to snag some throwback gear to boost your Buckeye fashion and not have to worry if someone else is rocking the same shirt as you. From t-shirts that more than likely were a freshman’s big buy at the bookstore on their first year on campus to crewnecks that are perfect for those cool fall days, here are a few looks to keep on your radar this season.

Poppin’ Tags

Have you caught the Buckeye thrifting bug? Here’s a few other spots in the city to fill your needs.

RAG-O-RAMA | 3301 N HIGH ST.
OUT OF THE CLOSET | 1230 N HIGH ST. CLOTHING UNDERGROUND, 1652 N HIGH ST.

GOODWILL | MULTIPLE LOCATIONS
SALVATION ARMY | MULTIPLE LOCATIONS
OHIO THRIFT | MULTIPLE LOCATIONS
VOLUNTEERS OF AMERICA | MULTIPLE LOCATIONS

Smartypants Vintage is located on 815 N High St. For hours and more vintage options, check out @smartypantsvintage on Instagram.

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Fashion

I Feel Pretty

I discovered tweezers at the ripe age of 12 and immediately developed an obsessive relationship with them. I pluck, pluck, plucked my brows until I couldn’t pluck anymore. (Literally. My mom had to physically disarm me and hide the tool for good.) By the end of it, you could count my remaining hairs on just [...]
Regina Fox

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I discovered tweezers at the ripe age of 12 and immediately developed an obsessive relationship with them. I pluck, pluck, plucked my brows until I couldn’t pluck anymore. (Literally. My mom had to physically disarm me and hide the tool for good.) By the end of it, you could count my remaining hairs on just a few fingers.My brows never really bounced back from my pre-teen years and to be honest, I don’t blame them—I clearly couldn’t handle the responsibility. So when the “boy brow” became the one and only style to sport, I was left out in the cold. That is until I discovered Pretty In Ink and got my eyebrows cosmetically tattooed.Mandi Chisholm, the owner of the gorgeous downtown loft, goes simply by her first name. She has been beautifying brows since 2008 when she became formally trained, certified, and licensed for cosmetic tattoo applications. With some conversation, numbing cream, and a whole lot of expertise, she turned me into the “after” version of myself I didn’t know I could be. Let me tell you a little more about how I ditched my brow burden.ConsultationThe first step to my brow makeover was a consultation. Mandi and I met to discuss three things—skin type, lifestyle, and expectations—in order to pinpoint which tattooing service was best suited for me. Oily skin, a fast metabolism, and exercise can all contribute to rapid fading. Lucky for me, I check all three boxes. I also told Mandi that I was in the market for a natural-looking fix to my 90s eyebrows which narrowed my options down to two: machine tattooed brows and microblading.Machine brows are done using a fine needle within a hand piece powered by electricity to puncture and deposit pigment. Microblading, on the other hand, is a very popular, manual application using a simple blade to place the pigment into the skin. Machine brows tend to last a little longer, while microblading is more of a superficial application of pigment placed just a little higher in the dermis.To be honest, I had never heard of the former and the sounds of it intimidated me a bit. But, considering the toll my skin type and lifestyle would take from microblading, Mandi and I both agreed that machine tattooed brows were the best, most durable option to meet my eyebrow expectations.DrawingAfter considering the shape of my face and some #browgoals photos I showed her, Mandi used a makeup pencil to fill in my brows. This would ultimately become the shape of my tattooed brows, so I made sure to take my time and vocalize any changes I wanted to make. Once we settled on a shape, Mandi leaned me back in the chair and booted up the tattoo machine.TattooingNow, we all have different levels of tolerance, but in my opinion, the pain was minimal. The cosmetic tattoo machine hurts far less than a typical tattoo machine. Plus, after the first pass, Mandi slathered me up with numbing cream which eliminated the pain entirely. All I had to do was sit back and relax for about 90 minutes while Mandi worked her magic.The RevealWhen Mandi handed me the mirror for the first time, my jaw dropped—even further than it did when I got my braces off in 9th grade. My eyebrows looked fantastic! You couldn’t tell where my real eyebrows ended and the tattooing began! I couldn’t wait to go show them off.AftercareWith cosmetically tattooed eyebrows, you really have to channel your inner Philadelphia 76er and trust the process. On day one, my brows were precise and bold. By day three, the tattooed hair strokes had seemingly disappeared into clumps of brown scabs. And when the scabs healed, my tattoo pigment underneath was faded and did not match my natural eyebrow hair. But, this is all part of the process.Touch upI used a makeup pencil to supplement my faded tattoos until it was time for my touch up appointment a few weeks later. Mandi retraced my hair strokes and the healing process began all over but this time, when the scabs healed, my perfect brows miraculously reemerged and were there to stay. As long as I avoid the sun and excessive moisturization, I expect to not be back in the Pretty In Ink chair until this time next year.There’s a meme floating around FaceSpace that says, “When I was little, I never thought eyebrows would be this important.” What I’ve learned is that eyebrows themselves are just a couple stretches of hair on your forehead, but the confidence they give you is what’s so important. I can “face” each day self-assuredly without a lick of makeup and that is the power of cosmetic tattoos.
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