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Opening Volley

If not for the unrelenting onslaught of Columbus winter, I would be without one of my all-time favorite memories. Last New Year’s Eve, the first I shared with my girlfriend, we spent the end of the night walking home in the middle of a Victorian Village street, the snow and ice enveloping the area and [...]
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If not for the unrelenting onslaught of Columbus winter, I would be without one of my all-time favorite memories.

Last New Year’s Eve, the first I shared with my girlfriend, we spent the end of the night walking home in the middle of a Victorian Village street, the snow and ice enveloping the area and rendering traffic non-existent. The typical symphony of city noises muffled by the cover, we slipped and slid together in a near-perfect silence, only punctuated by our own laughter.

Oh, and hiccups. I drank a LOT of champagne.

I relay that story not to brag about a romantic moment, but to say that as much as we bemoan the seemingly constant terror of our city’s cold-month weather, it’s inextricable from the profile of Columbus living. In fact, I would venture to say that without those icy cobblestones and snow-covered trees, that story isn’t nearly as sweet sounding. If that NYE had taken place in San Diego, I’m just a stumbling, drunk asshole with a better tan. In Columbus, it’s kind of a magical moment.

My point: Columbus is better, because for part of the year, it’s horribly shitty.

I know that sounds insane. Right now, I’m fighting a cold, sitting in front of a window that has six inches of snow crashing against it, and there is only roughly a 15-minute period right before I fall asleep, and right when I wake up, that I can actually feel all of my toes. And I still kind of love it. I think it’s just something you learn to appreciate over time, if not for any other reason than the way it contextualizes our experience here. Wherever you are reading this right now – snowed in at a coffee shop, waiting on a tow truck, whatever – close your eyes and think into the nearby future….

Think about that first day of Columbus Spring, about how euphoric it feels when the sun comes out early and stays late. All the local bars rip the shackles off their dormant patio spaces and everyone, in shorts and tank tops, frankly just kind of loses their shit for a little bit.

You know the day I’m talking about. For those of us who grew up in Ohio, it’s happened once a year every year since we were born (and most often, that first day of returned warmth is only an unofficial start to spring, as it tends to snow again almost immediately after that seemingly great thaw).

But, it’s a glorious day nonetheless. And we would never feel that glory if it was just raining Skittles all over High Street every day of the week.

Nope. In Columbus, we earn that glory, by facing down the brutal winter, giving it a kick in the frozen ‘nads with some good-old fashioned practical preppin’ – and not that crazy end-of-the-world nonsense. This month’s cover story (page 60) is your handy almanac, full of products and procedures to get you through one of the harshest winters on record.

It’s all the stuff your daddy taught ya – and you won’t have to text him for a refresher. (Which is helpful in case your power’s out and your phone’s dead).

Yes, it’s time to embrace the winter-y legacy of Columbus winter, kids. Besides, we have it much better than our folks: 35 years ago, they blasted their way through the Blizzard of 1978 (and with enough gas left in the tank to procreate, thankfully).

Man, that must have been one helluva first day of spring.

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Comedy

Transition Stage

In the standup comedy world, it’s a long-held goal of many young comics to build their act to where they finally get to “be themselves” on stage. You can take that premise and multiply it by 10 for Columbus native Riley Silverman. Coming up through the underground basement open mic and suburban one-nighter scene, Silverman [...]
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In the standup comedy world, it’s a long-held goal of many young comics to build their act to where they finally get to “be themselves” on stage.

You can take that premise and multiply it by 10 for Columbus native Riley Silverman.

Coming up through the underground basement open mic and suburban one-nighter scene, Silverman was not unlike any other Ohio comic, talking about the foibles of Midwestern life, but in 2009, she reached a dual breakthrough on-stage and off.

Comedy, as it turns out, facilitated coming out as trans for Silverman.

“I went from being someone viewing the world from a place that was inherently false, to being someone who was being completely open,” said Silverman, who moved to Los Angeles in 2010. “I was getting so much more honest and open in my act and I eventually just a hit a wall where if I didn’t do it, I would just be stuck in the same place forever.”

Since then, Silverman has been far from stuck in one place. With a full-length album under her belt (Intimate Apparel), as well as a recent appearance on Comedy Central’s Not Safe with Nikki Glaser, she's’ become a staple in the L.A. scene, and through her personal website (rileysilverman.tumblr.com) and Twitter page (@ryesilverman) she's also become a loud voice for the trans community beyond her local area code.

Ahead of her return appearance this month at Shadowbox Live’s Backstage Bistro, Silverman let (614) go backstage with her thoughts.

Where does the current standup world grade in terms of misogyny and transphobia?

I think we’re really in a sea of change. I think not just as a trans woman, but in general the world of stand-up is finally getting swarmed with so many different voices, it’s an amazing time to be part of it. There’s all this backlash against comedy being too safe or too politically correct, but I don’t see it that way. I see it as people who were previously kept quiet finally pushing those voices out there.

Recently that you performed and visited around your hometown as out. Can you describe the feelings that flooded you during those times? Your parents got you Star Wars makeup for Christmas, which must have been surreal...

SO surreal. Yeah, getting that makeup from my parents made me tear up Christmas morning. What is happening with me is difficult for them to understand, and we butt heads on it sometimes, but that was like a shining beacon of awareness that they do ultimately still love me and we’re gonna adjust to our new normal.

As far as the rest... there’s the saying “you can’t go home again,” and I am that to an extreme. I came out in Columbus but hadn’t decided to transition yet, but coming back now when I’m openly living as a woman, and with a different name, it’s like I came back as a different person, and the city is so different too. Whenever I come home it’s like I’m living a weird reboot film of my life. I’m Ghostbusters.

Or trading bra talk with Nikki Glaser…

Ha! That was actually strangely very comfortable and relaxed. It was funny because I met Nikki at the FunnyBone like eight years ago when I was still closeted, and we hadn’t seen each other since but kept in touch via the internet. When I got to set for the episode, the director actually purposefully kept us apart because he wanted us to reunite on camera. But I don’t know, maybe it’s the special bond of road comics, but it felt like we picked up right where we left off.

Have the comics that you look up to or admire changed as your life has?

Oh definitely. I think a lot of that is moving to LA and having a new pool of peers and influences. When I first started in Columbus in 2001, there weren’t a lot of female comics, a situation that has thankfully changed. There really weren’t any women in the generation of established comics before me to look up to. Eventually there were some amazing talents in my peer group like Laura Sanders and Nickey Winkelman, which was great, but most of the comedic role models I had were still men. But as a female comic in LA, I’ve got an embarrassment of riches in talented ladies to admire and now that’s who populates the list of comics I’m eager and excited to see. Comics like Maria Bamford, Eliza Skinner, Jackie Kashian or Beth Stelling for example—who is an Ohio girl too!

You’ve become a very active fighter of transphobia and injustice. Is that a hard thing to balance on social media as a woman who is passionate about equality and has a voice, but also someone who loves silly shit and making fun of pop culture?

The weirdest tweet to send is the first silly joke after going on a bit of a rant. I’ve actually had to actively kind of take a step back from it a little bit, really think about what I want to put out into the world energy wise. It can get really easy to get caught up in online arguments, and fighting can be pretty toxic mentally. I still believe very much in equality and social justice, but I just try to consider where my voice would be the most useful. I think it’s through comedy. A lot of people like to use the term “Social Justice Warrior” as a pejorative, but I tend to think of myself as a “Social Justice Bard.” My goal, and I’m not saying I’ve achieved this, is to sell my vision of the world through silly shit and pop culture jokes.

After years of feeling that your assigned gender didn’t fit your true gender, is it borderline surreal now to write jokes and find humor in your everyday activities more associated with females?

It was at first, I think I’ve settled into a good place with that though. When I first came out I was paranoid about being “too trans” in my material, I didn’t want my marginalized status to become my entire act so I’d limit how much of it I could talk about. But now that I’m past the point where everything is new and exciting, now this is just my life so that’s the filter through which I view the world and write comedy.

Who is the modern-day ally for the trans community?

Funny story about that, when I was home for Christmas, I did comedy at the FunnyBone for really the first time openly as woman, and was really excited about how well the show went. Afterwards, my friend Maria and I went to the mall restroom which I was SUPER nervous about—this was even before “bathroom bills” were a major national distract— er, topic. So I’m in the stall, actually a bit nervous and wishing I’d gone back to the club, and Maria is washing her hands at the sink when a loud drunk lady comes in and seems to be looking for me. So I get really tense and stay in the stall till she finally leaves. And Maria gets tense because she’s thinking she may have to get defensive for me in a second. Then the lady leaves. Then we do. And as we’re walking through the mall, this same lady sees me, stops me, and it turns out she had just been at the show and enjoyed my set and was trying to come get me to join her group for drinks. I think that’s the ideal ally. Someone who wants to buy me drinks. Or, at least just views me as a person instead of something that they have to deal with.

Is this the year Riley Silverman blows up, considering it’s prime time for the trans community and nerd girls are way in?

Riley Silverman is definitely blowing up this year, but that has more to do with chicken fingers and cheeseburgers than anything.

Silverman performs at Shadowbox September 6.

Editor's note: An unedited version of this story was printed earlier, resulting in a misgendering of the subject's identity. We apologize for the error(s) and will print an extended retraction in our next upcoming print issue.

Continue Reading

Comedy

Transition Stage

In the standup comedy world, it’s a long-held goal of many young comics to build their act to where they finally get to “be themselves” on stage. You can take that premise and multiply it by 10 for Columbus native Riley Silverman. Coming up through the underground basement open mic and suburban one-nighter scene, Silverman [...]
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Published

on

In the standup comedy world, it’s a long-held goal of many young comics to build their act to where they finally get to “be themselves” on stage.

You can take that premise and multiply it by 10 for Columbus native Riley Silverman.

Coming up through the underground basement open mic and suburban one-nighter scene, Silverman was not unlike any other Ohio comic, talking about the foibles of Midwestern life, but in 2009, she reached a dual breakthrough on-stage and off.

Comedy, as it turns out, facilitated coming out as trans for Silverman.

“I went from being someone viewing the world from a place that was inherently false, to being someone who was being completely open,” said Silverman, who moved to Los Angeles in 2010. “I was getting so much more honest and open in my act and I eventually just a hit a wall where if I didn’t do it, I would just be stuck in the same place forever.”

Since then, Silverman has been far from stuck in one place. With a full-length album under her belt (Intimate Apparel), as well as a recent appearance on Comedy Central’s Not Safe with Nikki Glaser, she's’ become a staple in the L.A. scene, and through her personal website (rileysilverman.tumblr.com) and Twitter page (@ryesilverman) she's also become a loud voice for the trans community beyond her local area code.

Ahead of her return appearance this month at Shadowbox Live’s Backstage Bistro, Silverman let (614) go backstage with her thoughts.

Where does the current standup world grade in terms of misogyny and transphobia?

I think we’re really in a sea of change. I think not just as a trans woman, but in general the world of stand-up is finally getting swarmed with so many different voices, it’s an amazing time to be part of it. There’s all this backlash against comedy being too safe or too politically correct, but I don’t see it that way. I see it as people who were previously kept quiet finally pushing those voices out there.

Recently that you performed and visited around your hometown as out. Can you describe the feelings that flooded you during those times? Your parents got you Star Wars makeup for Christmas, which must have been surreal...

SO surreal. Yeah, getting that makeup from my parents made me tear up Christmas morning. What is happening with me is difficult for them to understand, and we butt heads on it sometimes, but that was like a shining beacon of awareness that they do ultimately still love me and we’re gonna adjust to our new normal.

As far as the rest... there’s the saying “you can’t go home again,” and I am that to an extreme. I came out in Columbus but hadn’t decided to transition yet, but coming back now when I’m openly living as a woman, and with a different name, it’s like I came back as a different person, and the city is so different too. Whenever I come home it’s like I’m living a weird reboot film of my life. I’m Ghostbusters.

Or trading bra talk with Nikki Glaser…

Ha! That was actually strangely very comfortable and relaxed. It was funny because I met Nikki at the FunnyBone like eight years ago when I was still closeted, and we hadn’t seen each other since but kept in touch via the internet. When I got to set for the episode, the director actually purposefully kept us apart because he wanted us to reunite on camera. But I don’t know, maybe it’s the special bond of road comics, but it felt like we picked up right where we left off.

Have the comics that you look up to or admire changed as your life has?

Oh definitely. I think a lot of that is moving to LA and having a new pool of peers and influences. When I first started in Columbus in 2001, there weren’t a lot of female comics, a situation that has thankfully changed. There really weren’t any women in the generation of established comics before me to look up to. Eventually there were some amazing talents in my peer group like Laura Sanders and Nickey Winkelman, which was great, but most of the comedic role models I had were still men. But as a female comic in LA, I’ve got an embarrassment of riches in talented ladies to admire and now that’s who populates the list of comics I’m eager and excited to see. Comics like Maria Bamford, Eliza Skinner, Jackie Kashian or Beth Stelling for example—who is an Ohio girl too!

You’ve become a very active fighter of transphobia and injustice. Is that a hard thing to balance on social media as a woman who is passionate about equality and has a voice, but also someone who loves silly shit and making fun of pop culture?

The weirdest tweet to send is the first silly joke after going on a bit of a rant. I’ve actually had to actively kind of take a step back from it a little bit, really think about what I want to put out into the world energy wise. It can get really easy to get caught up in online arguments, and fighting can be pretty toxic mentally. I still believe very much in equality and social justice, but I just try to consider where my voice would be the most useful. I think it’s through comedy. A lot of people like to use the term “Social Justice Warrior” as a pejorative, but I tend to think of myself as a “Social Justice Bard.” My goal, and I’m not saying I’ve achieved this, is to sell my vision of the world through silly shit and pop culture jokes.

After years of feeling that your assigned gender didn’t fit your true gender, is it borderline surreal now to write jokes and find humor in your everyday activities more associated with females?

It was at first, I think I’ve settled into a good place with that though. When I first came out I was paranoid about being “too trans” in my material, I didn’t want my marginalized status to become my entire act so I’d limit how much of it I could talk about. But now that I’m past the point where everything is new and exciting, now this is just my life so that’s the filter through which I view the world and write comedy.

Who is the modern-day ally for the trans community?

Funny story about that, when I was home for Christmas, I did comedy at the FunnyBone for really the first time openly as woman, and was really excited about how well the show went. Afterwards, my friend Maria and I went to the mall restroom which I was SUPER nervous about—this was even before “bathroom bills” were a major national distract— er, topic. So I’m in the stall, actually a bit nervous and wishing I’d gone back to the club, and Maria is washing her hands at the sink when a loud drunk lady comes in and seems to be looking for me. So I get really tense and stay in the stall till she finally leaves. And Maria gets tense because she’s thinking she may have to get defensive for me in a second. Then the lady leaves. Then we do. And as we’re walking through the mall, this same lady sees me, stops me, and it turns out she had just been at the show and enjoyed my set and was trying to come get me to join her group for drinks. I think that’s the ideal ally. Someone who wants to buy me drinks. Or, at least just views me as a person instead of something that they have to deal with.

Is this the year Riley Silverman blows up, considering it’s prime time for the trans community and nerd girls are way in?

Riley Silverman is definitely blowing up this year, but that has more to do with chicken fingers and cheeseburgers than anything.

Silverman performs at Shadowbox September 6.

Editor's note: An unedited version of this story was printed earlier, resulting in a misgendering of the subject's identity. We apologize for the error(s) and will print an extended retraction in our next upcoming print issue.

Continue Reading

Comedy

Pretty Fly For a White Dad

Jimmy Mak is a silly dude. I imagine the photos accompanying this story sell that sufficiently. And while the two-decade Shadowbox veteran has made a career of shamelessly playing nerds, jocks, girls, and cops, Mak has now turned author, penning a collection of poems, memoirs, and self-deprecating anecdotes built around one of his most favorite [...]
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Jimmy Mak is a silly dude.I imagine the photos accompanying this story sell that sufficiently.And while the two-decade Shadowbox veteran has made a career of shamelessly playing nerds, jocks, girls, and cops, Mak has now turned author, penning a collection of poems, memoirs, and self-deprecating anecdotes built around one of his most favorite pastimes: mortifying his daughters Riley and Roz.As if they didn’t cringe enough just hearing the stories of their father earnestly performing as “Phantom J,” in Steubenville, the break dance capital of the River Valley, now they will have his proud dad humor committed to permanent press in the soon-to-be-released Daddies Shouldn’t Breakdance.But, the book isn’t all of parent trying to embarrass child—Mak also digs deeper, examining his own role as a son, husband, and a brother, recalling colorful tales of his childhood growing up in a hectic household where tough jokes and sibling slaps were run of the mill. His careful placement of earnest poetry makes it that much easier to chuckle at passages of prose such as, “I don’t remember how it started but I do remember Misty dumping some very hot mashed potatoes on Jerry’s arm,” and “I will never forget that sound of the banana peel slapping my brother’s face.” Not to mention sections that feature titles like “The Bubba Jim Chronicles,” and “No Trouble in Little China.”This month, he put down the cardboard on a loading dock at Shadowbox and gave (614) the back story behind the book.Okay, so first question: Daddies really shouldn’t break dance, right? Um, I believe I answer that with the title of the book. That’s like asking Maya Angelou, “Hey, do you really know why the caged bird sings?” (I just realized I inadvertently compared myself to Maya Angelou. I apologize and it won’t happen again.)I feel like it’s every father’s duty to embarrass his children. Perhaps even more so as the father of two girls. Is putting out a book the ultimate way to just scorch the earth in that sense? First off, I never set out to embarrass them. I set out to humiliate them. I figure if they can survive my sense of humor, they’ll be more ready to tackle a world where Kim Kardashian is a celebrity and Donald Trump could be President.The Kickstarter description is: “A celebration of life’s absurdity, featuring humorous essays, short stories, uncensored observations and poignant poetry.” Poignant poetry? You really are trying to make your kids die from embarrassment, right? Honestly, I was just going for alliteration. I tried “Puffy Poetry,” “Pulchritudinous Poetry,” and even “Poetic Poetry,” but none of those felt right.Was there any inspiration from other kids’ books? There’s plenty of them out there. How did you feel yours differed? This book is very much for adults. I would compare it to the style of Dave Barry, David Sedaris or Paul Feig but you know, with more f-words.Is the audience for this book mostly dads? Or families as a whole? Hopefully the audience for this book is everybody. Yes, there are a lot of stories about being a Dad, but there are also stories about being a kid, being a brother, being a neighbor, being a husband and being a dude just trying to figure it all out.How about your dad? Tell me about how his humor influenced you. Were you embarrassed of it then, but now you appreciate it? My Dad loved the old slapstick-style comedians and used to wake me up way too early on Saturday mornings when there was a Marx Brothers or Laurel and Hardy or W.C. Fields movie coming on. I didn’t know then that it was career training. He used to totally embarrass all of us at restaurants. He had these fake tiny dollar bills and would always pull them out and tell the server he was going to leave them a “small” tip. My whole family did facepalms before facepalms were a thing.When the book is officially out, how will your girls receive it? I assume you will bring it up, and dust if off every single chance you get, right? Well, they influenced a lot of it so if the book is not well received I’ll make sure they know it’s their fault.Finally, give me one sentence of advice for other dads out there—that sums up this book in a nutshell:  Never forget that your kid is just you without hindsight.Daddies Shouldn’t Breakdance will be available via Amazon this fall. For updates, visit kickstarter.com/projects/639106502/daddies-shouldnt-breakdance.
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