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Nancy’s Home Cooking ensures no one goes hungry on Thanksgiving

Aaron Wetli

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Rick Hahn is passionate; passionate about his restaurant, passionate about his community, and most especially passionate about the assistance he offers to those in need.

Serving hearty breakfasts and delicious lunches (get the chicken and noodles), Nancy’s Home Cooking has been a Clintonville staple since it was opened by Nancy Kammerling in 1968. In 1970, Kammerling sold the business to Cindy King who ran the restaurant for nearly 40 years before niece Shelia Hahn took the reins.

Flash forward three years and both King and Hahn, neither of whom would turn away a customer in need, had passed away, leaving the future of the restaurant in doubt. This is where Shelia’s husband Rick stepped in.

“I married into the King family but still didn’t know anything about cooking,” Rick said. “I learned from watching a lot of cooking shows on television. I just felt that I had to keep Nancy’s going and to continue Cindy and Shelia’s commitment to serving the community.”

On his watch, Hahn has implemented a Pay It Forward program that serves between 10 and 20 customers a day. In short, for $5, you can purchase a future meal for someone in need; the only caveat is that the buyer has to write a message on a post it note that is delivered with the lunch.

“People can write whatever they would like,” Rick explained. “Some messages are funny and some are inspirational. Some are even movie quotes or jokes. The important thing is that the notes brighten the day of the person who receives it.”

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It should be noted that these Pay It Forward meals are not just a box with a turkey sandwich, potato chips and an apple. Those who receive the meal can choose from chicken and noodles; biscuits and gravy; a breakfast platter; Southwest chili; grilled cheese; and bean soup and cornbread. The menu is seasonal and changes for appropriate outdoor weather conditions.

At the suggestion of girlfriend Richelle, Hahn also offers personal hygiene kits to those who ask. These kits, which come in drawstring backpacks, aren’t cheap to assemble (about $10 each) and contain a 30 day supply of soap, toothpaste, wipes, toothbrushes, deodorant, shampoo and other assorted toiletries. Women’s kits also contain feminine hygiene products.

“As for the kits, no one is turned away. You don’t even have to eat here to get one,” said Rick.

The real Belle of the Ball, though, is Rick’s Thanksgiving Dinner. Last year Rick, with help from his staff, family and neighborhood volunteers (different shifts of 50 each), served over 500 dinners to the community. Canopies, tables, and different stations line High St., the attitude is festive, and again, no one is turned away.

“On Thanksgiving, we are probably in violation of a few zoning laws, but I don’t think anyone really cares. All of the other businesses are closed that day and we have High Street to ourselves,” Rick said while laughing.

And what a Thanksgiving dinner it is. Last year’s menu contained the regular Thanksgiving staples—turkey, ham, rolls, green beans and mashed potatoes as well as pizza, shrimp cocktail, brisket, ribs, and lobster. Not too shabby.

“Not everyone who comes to the meal is homeless or even necessarily in need. Some of the attendees are elderly, have no family, or have no other place to go. I’m happy to give them a place to go,” said Rick through a smile.

It is safe to say that Rick has honored the legacy of the King Family.

Nancy’s Home Cooking is located at 3133 N High St. If you would like to donate money towards the Pay it Forward meals or Thanksgiving Dinner, you can do so in person or use PayPal.Me/nancyshomecooking. You can also drop off new/unused toiletries at Nancy’s from 6 a.m.–2:30 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday and from 8 a.m.–2:30 p.m. on Sunday.

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Columbus’s John Tortorella Coach of the Year finalist

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Blue Jackets coach John Tortorella / photo by Lori Schmidt

The NHL has announced that Columbus Blue Jackets head man John Tortorella is a finalist for the Jack Adams Coach of the Year Award. If he beats out Bruce Cassidy of the Boston Bruins and Alain Vigneault of the Philadelphia Flyers, it will be the third time Tortorella has taken home the honor. 

He’s been a finalist for the award four times.

Not many seasons have been like this one, though. 

Before COVID-19 interrupted the Blue Jackets season, Columbus went 33-22-15 despite losing 419 man games to injury. 

Among those missing significant time for the Blue Jackets: last year’s leading goal scorer (Cam Atkinson), the team’s All-Star defenseman (Seth Jones), and All-Star goaltender (Joonas Korpisalo). 

Even as players fell to injury, the team rose to ninth place in the Eastern Conference, which qualified them for the modified postseason, which is scheduled for next month.

Columbus will face Toronto in Toronto for a best-of-five Stanley Cup Playoff qualifying round, the dates for the first games of which are set.

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Prior to that, Columbus will face Boston July 30 at 7 p.m. in an exhibition game. 

It won’t be long after that, Tortorella will learn if he is the NHL’s coach of the year. The winners of this year’s NHL honors will be revealed during the Conference Finals.

Hear captain Nick Foligno's thoughts on the Stanley Cup Playoffs below.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n6OyEsL0h68
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Ohio high school fall sports are on…for now

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Interim Executive Director of the Ohio High School Athletic Association Bob Goldring today announced that, as of now, fall sports are going ahead as scheduled. The decision as to whether to cancel play over COVID-19 concerns will be left up to individual schools. 

Goldring added that this could easily change. He talked about the fact that the governor might make a ruling that affects the ability of athletes, particularly those in contact sports, to play. 

There has been some discussion of pushing back the start date of sports in which the most contact occurs, particularly after This Week Sports reported an unknown number of local high school football coaches had suggested moving football to the spring, while having baseball staged in the fall.

Goldring did admit they have been looking at options and said they would be naive not to do so, especially because 80 percent of their revenue comes from ticket sales. Without games being played, tough decisions will certainly have to be made. 

 “The fiscal part of things is very much on my radar,” Goldring said. 

As to whether fans would actually be able to buy tickets and attend games if they do go ahead? Goldring said that, too, is ultimately a local matter. 

OHSAA may cut the minimum number of games a football team is required to play to qualify for the playoffs to account for the possibility of only some games being canceled. 

The board of directors is also still pondering the question of whether athletes can take the field if they are relying on virtual learning and aren’t allowed into the classroom. 

Right now, though, they are proceeding as if the fall season will kick off Aug. 1.

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Buckeyes back to work

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Ohio State athletics is permitting athletes from seven different sports to resume voluntary workouts after a pause due to an outbreak of COVID-19. 

Ohio State defensive back Shaun Wade heads into a workout

The university said that all athletes were tested Monday before determining that the resumption was safe. 

“These young people come from across the nation and the world to be part of our Ohio State family, and we do everything we can to create a safe, healthy environment so that they have a chance to study and compete,” said Athletics Director Gene Smith. “Our medical team will continue to evaluate, and we will share decisions as we move forward.”

The Buckeyes have refused to say how many athletes have tested positive, but longtime beat reporter Tim May had said it was fewer than ten. 

OSU teams with athletes currently working out on campus are football, men’s and women’s basketball, field hockey, men’s and women’s soccer, and women’s volleyball.

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