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New Columbus attraction is “the future of bowling”

Mike Thomas

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When it comes to bowling, you probably think you’ve seen it all. Well think again! An all-new, out-of-this-world bowling experience has touched down in Central Ohio—and bowling may never be the same!

Star Lanes Polaris has announced the addition of HyperBowling, the newest attraction from bowling equipment supplier QubicaAMF. HyperBowling brings together a hi-tech blend of software, futuristic user interfaces, lights, and sensors to deliver a never-before-seen experience that plays like a physical video game on a bowling lane. Star Lanes is the first location in Ohio to offer this experience.

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According to a press release, HyperBowling is “the future of bowling,” providing an interactive and immersive experience for bowlers of all skill levels. Since the rules of HyperBowling differ from the traditional game, even novice bowlers can score and win.

“We are proud to have teamed with QubicaAMF to provide a new kind of interactive social experience to Star Lanes,” says Doug Mechling, co-owner of Star Lanes Polaris via a statement. “HyperBowling is bowling like you’ve never experienced. We always look for ways to add more diverse and engaging entertainment options for our guests – and we think HyperBowling definitely accomplishes that goal.”

With a new intelligent lighting system, integrated scoring, and a wide variety of on-lane, interactive entertainment available, see for yourself what makes HyperBowling the wave of the future for this popular pastime.

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Day of the Dead at Green Lawn Cemetery celebrates ancestors, food, art

Mitch Hooper

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What do you think of when someone mentions Halloween? Here in the states, it typically means haunted houses, costumed parties, scary movies, and of course, pumpkin spice everything. It’s a chance to explore horror, a time to be silly (or sexy), and above all, it’s a small break from reality. But not all things October are escapist or ghoulish, Día de los Muertos—Day of the Dead for those who failed Spanish 101—is a cultural celebration that dates back to the Aztecs.

The original Day of the Dead celebrations took place in the beginning of summer, and eventually moved to coincide with All Saint’s Day and All Soul’s Day. Families and friends would prepare a picnic to eat at the graves of their loved ones as they shared memories to keep the spirits of those now gone alive. The mood was celebratory, stemming from cultural beliefs that the dead would not approve of mourning.

This celebration is something Leticia Vazquez-Smith, president of Latino Arts for Humanity in Columbus, holds close to her heart, as she grew up in Mexico City. Those memories stuck with her when she moved to Ohio in 1999 and became the basis for how she began celebrating here in the States. It started in her apartment where she was asked to give a presentation on something she loved. Naturally, she picked Day of the Dead. With a full heart, she did things such as making traditional dishes like tamales for the community members looking to stop by.

“I wanted to share the roots of the real thing,” Vazquez- Smith explained.

But, that was 20 years ago. Now, the crowd is too large for her home and she and Latino Arts for Humanity have partnered with Green Lawn Cemetery for a Day of the Dead celebration with authentic Mexican food, calaveritas (sugar skulls) poem readings, and music, and dancing from Latino community members in Columbus.

What started as a passion has blossomed into a citywide event where more than 2,000 people will show up, pay respects, and experience a cultural happening that might be difficult to find in a state more than 2,000 miles away from its origin.

The Columbus Day of the Dead celebration will be on Oct. 19, and will include traditional food trucks, music and dancers, art vendors, and educational courses for children. Each year’s celebration offers a new theme for visitors, and this year will focus on the ocean. In keeping with the celebration of life, the entire day has been “greened”—from vendors avoiding single-use plastic items to educational conversations about pollution.

Vazquez-Smith said in the years past, the event had been held out of almost anywhere they could find, such as galleries in the Short North or warehouses around town. But once she and her team discovered Green Lawn Cemetery hosted outdoor movie screenings, an idea was planted. They wondered if the cemetery would be interested in hosting a Day of the Dead celebration and Green Lawn happily obliged.

“When Green Lawn was founded, it was meant to be in-part green space for the city; in-part a place where people could come out, walk the trails, and have picnics. It was meant to be more than a place to bury your dad, but also come out and celebrate and remember their ancestors,” said Randy Rogers, president of the Green Lawn Cemetery Association.

This idea of celebrating ancestors, having picnics, and all the steps in between parallels nicely with Day of the Dead. And for Rogers, inclusivity is something he finds very important as Green Lawn Cemetery is a space that has grown with the community around it. Green Lawn is without many regulations for burial sites and markers, which allows different groups to express their cultural beliefs, even in death. A partnership with Latino Arts for Humanity for a Day of the Dead celebration seemed to be the perfect expression of that philosophy.

“I always equate it with the writings of Dante, Dante’s epic poem, ‘La Vita Nuova.’ He’s writing about his new life after the death of his love,” Rogers explained. “As he tells that story, he also talks about her new life in the afterlife and that carries through as he encounters her again in The Inferno. And that’s kind of like Day of the Dead because you’re celebrating the lives of your ancestors after they passed— you’re celebrating their new life in the afterlife.”

This theme of inclusivity runs deeper. Vazquez-Smith said this year she expects a wide variety of cultures to attend ranging from African-American communities to Midwesterners who grew up right here their entire lives. For the Mexico City native, this is exactly what she had hoped for.

“Day of the Dead shouldn’t be an only Mexican tradition. We’re all going to die, that’s a fact. If you have time to do a little grieving, sharing your food with your family, it’s something the society here doesn’t have. They don’t have that day to be free to talk to the people who are not here body wise,” Vazquez-Smith said. “Everything is about the thought of living and dying. Any kind of culture that wants to come and do something with us, they are welcome. It’s for everybody.”

Green Lawn Cemetery is located on 1000 Green Lawn Avenue. The Day of the Dead event will take place on Oct. 18 from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.

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Ohio Theater movie screening this weekend is a bunch of Hocus Pocus

Regina Fox

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Halloween is not quite the same unless you watch the zany comedic chaos of Hocus Pocus unfold a few dozen times. This year, up the ante on your witchy binge spree with a screening of the popular Disney classic at Ohio Theater!

That's right, you can cast spells and chase your youth right alongside the Sanderson sisters on the big screen during CAPA's Spook Out Movie Magic featuring intermission entertainment from organist Clark Wilson and a Hocus Pocus-themed costume competition.

Participants will parade into the theatre where the costumes will be judged. Winners will be announced at intermission and receive CAPA gift certificate prizes.

Spook Out Movie Magic is happening Sunday, October 20 at 3pm. Day-of-show tickets are $5 and go on sale one hour prior to show time at the Ohio Theatre kiosk (cash only) or the CAPA Ticket Center (39 E. State St.). For more information, visit capa.com.

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LeBron James Jr. hitting the court at Nationwide Arena this winter

Regina Fox

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Haven't had the time or funds to be witness to the higher power's gift to athletics, LeBron James? Soon, you'll have the opportunity to experience the next best thing right here in Columbus: LeBron's son.

Bronny James will be participating in the Ohio Scholastic Play-by-Play Classic at Nationwide Arena this December. He'll be joined by some of the top high school talent in the country, including Zaire Wade, son of former Miami Heat guard Dwayne Wade.

Both James and Wade play for the prep team Sierra Canyon out of California, reports 10TV. The two basketball proteges will tip off against St. Vincent-St. Mary, LeBron's alma mater.

The Ohio Scholastic Play-by-Play is going down December 14 at Nationwide Arena. Tickets go on sale Tuesday, October 15 at 10am at the Big Lots Box Office at Nationwide Arena, on tickermaster.com and at all participating schools. To learn more, visit playbyplayclassics.com.

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